Maria Callas and walking with Bentley.

There is something out of this world listening to Maria Callas singing. The documentary about her life that I watched was sublime and to hear her sing, tears of joy.

https://www.netflix.com/title/81012106

In the many interviews shown on this documentary she admits that it was her bullying mother that forced her into the world of music right from her early years. She said that perhaps her life would have been happier having had children and a conventional life. When she became aware of her singing capturing rapturous audiences she felt she had to give her voice over to the world. And she did unstintingly. Her love to Onassis was about a gift to a soulless rogue. She died relatively young but at least in Paris.

As for walking Bentley. He is inside a lot so when I take him out I feel he should be allowed to behave what his nature intended him to express. That involves a lot of investigating smells left behind by other canines. I think it is cruel to train dogs to ignore what comes natural except of course when trained for blind or guiding purposes.

I think it fair exchange to allow Bentley to be a dog when I walk him and I take full responsibility for any misadventure I might suffer as a consequence of that tolerance.

He generally is slowly coming to realise he shouldnโ€™t dart in and out in front of my and he does look at me with some regret when he gives in to his nature overcoming him.

I mean, donโ€™t men behave erratic at times?

Putin?

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22 Responses to “Maria Callas and walking with Bentley.”

  1. auntyuta Says:

    I think active men are entitled to a bit of erratic behavior. It seems to be in their nature. You can see it in boys: They take risks, that maybe most girls would not take . . . .

    Liked by 1 person

    • auntyuta Says:

      There is nothing more uplifting than listening to a supreme singing voice, such as that of Maria Callas. I think I want to catch up on finding out more about her life. Thanks for the link Gerard! ๐Ÿ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      Both boys and girls can take risks. Nurture or nature?
      Countries that bring up the young as children instead of separating them by sex might be a better way to go.

      Like

      • auntyuta Says:

        As a young child I never felt separated by sex. I am sure there were as many boys, that were my friends, as there were girls.
        Still, even as a very young child I felt that boys showed their feelings in a different way from the way girls would act and behave. I thought, I was not like a girl should be. I did not like all this ‘girly’ stuff. I was happy, when I could dress a bit like a boy, and when I could do a few things that boys did. But some things that boys had no trouble doing, I just could not do! ๐Ÿ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Mal Kukura Says:

    Is your Bentley an Old English Ship Dog? A Pomeranian? A Shi Tzu? A Beijingeezer? A Dachshund? A Bijon Frieze? If all dogs are born equal then your Bentley is lucky enough to insipre the entire K9 population of the planet.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. doesitevenmatter3 Says:

    Maria Callas’ voice is so beautiful it always brings tears to my eyes. ๐Ÿ™‚
    We all have erratic behavior at times. Sadly, some worse than others.
    I walk Cooper like you walk Bentley. It’s a time for them to really explore all the smells and sights and sounds that surround them. ๐Ÿ™‚
    (((HUGS))) ๐Ÿ™‚

    Liked by 2 people

  4. shoreacres Says:

    I decided to keep Netflix for a while, so I’ve added the documentary about Callas to my watch list. Her voice is heavenly, and I enjoyed the video you included in the post, as well.

    As for Bentley: what appears erratic to a human often is quite purposeful from a dog’s perspective. Watching a dog explore territory is akin to watching an active butterfly. All that flitting can seem a waste of energy to the human eye, but the butterfly knows what it’s up to.

    Liked by 2 people

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      Yes, Linda. That Netflix video is a very well-made documentary. She is a good interviewee and articulates her life without artifice or fear.
      Yes, Bentley really needs that explorative walk and is besides himself when I pick up his lead.

      In the past dogs used to roam freely around the neighbourhood but that is now all gone, forbidden.
      Of course, we now all walk and pick up after the dog and arm ourselves with disposable plastic bags.

      Bentley looks at me, when I pick up his dropping, with some sort of glee. He sometimes does it in front of a cafรฉ where people are sipping their morning’s latte!

      That’s nature, I suppose

      Liked by 2 people

      • auntyuta Says:

        Our little dog, a miniature fox terrier, died in November 1989, just a few weeks before Caroline turned two.
        She, Cha-Cha, was sixteen when she died. We called her ‘Rinny’. We did have her for fourteen years.
        I think, we never had a lead for her. She was always allowed to run about freely. She loved to chase cows! ๐Ÿ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

      • auntyuta Says:

        Correction, Rinny died in November 1980, not 1979! I remember, because Caroline, who was very fond of the dog, was nearly two! ๐Ÿ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

  5. petspeopleandlife Says:

    Going on walks with Bentley is therapeutic for him and for you. I really do not like opera, but I admire the talent of operatic singers. I once read an article that dogs should be allowed to sniff because that is an innate behavior inherited from their wild forebears. My dogs all get to run with abandon on my one acre and therefore they are free to run without being tethered to a lease. I am so thankful that I don’t need to walk my dogs. It seems they walk me as I plod along with a free-range pack of dogs. It is fun to see how they move from bush to tree to flower and as Linda so aptly put it, dogs dart about like a butterfly.

    Like

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      Yes, I like opera and apart from staged opera, it is all around us in the form of human behavior. That’s why I like going to clubs and watch people in action. One just has to imagine music to add to it.
      Bentley is a terrific friend and one forgets he is a dog.’

      Liked by 1 person

  6. rangewriter Says:

    A few years ago the city planted a speed sign on the edge of my lawn, beside the sidewalk. Everyone but the passing dogs ignores the sign. The grass surround the sign post grows so much faster than the rest of the grass. And I always laugh as I watch dog’s people having to stop for the essentials at the sign. So I finally made a little sign to hang on the post. “Canine Communication Center.” ๐Ÿคฃ

    Like

  7. Curt Mekemson Says:

    Glad to hear that you and Bently are enjoying your walks, Gerard. And indeed, he is aware of a whole world that is outside of our senses. And, as you can tell, takes great joy in exploring it. Taking time to stop and “smell the roses” of our particular world is good for all of us. โ€“Curt

    Like

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      Yes, I wonder how good our sense of smell is compared with dogs. I can certainly pick a good dish by its smell.
      A wild rose has the best smell and the commercially grown ones hardly have a smell.
      Glad to see you back, Curt.

      Like

      • Curt Mekemson Says:

        Out of curiosity I googled it Gerard. Heres what it said: “What do dog noses have that humans don’t? They possess up to 300 million olfactory receptors in their noses, compared to about six million in us. And the part of a dog’s brain that is devoted to analyzing smells is about 40 times greater than ours.” ๐Ÿ™‚
        And thanks,I’m glad to be back! โ€“Curt

        Liked by 1 person

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