A Bird’s own home.

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The latest attempt at blending my life with as much nature as possible resulted in trying to lure birds to within my own domicile. I thought it reasonable to provide them with a interest-free mortgage on a comfortable abode with monthly instalment paid for in colourful plumage with much squawking.  A period in spring with much cavorting and popping into the nest to lay eggs would be a bonus worthy of an even better nest, but let’s just wait for the first ones to arrive. My patience will surely be rewarded!

At my previous abode ( with the pathologically obsessed tree & garden slasher) there were birds galore with the white cockatoos finally dominating the scene. We had to stop leaving unlimited bird-mix around because the corellas became wise to it and would just hoard the feed all day. The corellas really seemed to like that area and flocks of hundreds would be flying about making unbelievable rackets. Hanging from electric wires, rolling around the parks like drunken sailors all in white uniforms, yellow capped and all. Shameless whoring going on at every corner, you would not want to believe what those corellas are up to.

Fruit trees had to be solidly fences off and netted with steel wire. The use of birds of prey (falcon) The use of a drone for bird-scaring purposes. Electronic bird scaring devices. These are some of the things farmers have to use to save their fruit crops from corella annihilation.

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After my eye operation finally went ahead when restriction on elective surgeries were lifted due to the corona virus, I had time to think about attracting birds to my new place. I managed to buy a simple bird box but if I was a bird I would not go near it. There are not too many bird nest specialist builders around. It looked too much like a trap and I felt it needed to be made more welcoming and friendlier looking. Birds are sensitive creatures. The box looked like something out of an isolated dreary far flung suburb where people still adorned the azaleas by surrounding them with worn out car tires. (painted white). Poor azaleas, poor birds.

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What do you think of my bird’s box now? Do you think it will entice some birds to come and not only feed but feel comfortable in making a home inside this box.?

I was careful not to show myself for a few days after my eye operation in case they mistook me for a dreaded corella.

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Of course, I am not really against corellas, I just don’t want so many to so mercilessly dominate other birds and they do.

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27 Responses to “A Bird’s own home.”

  1. leggypeggy Says:

    Hope the bird box is a great success. Glad your eye surgery is out of the way.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Yvonne Says:

    I hope some birds take up your offer for public housing.

    This link will give you plans for a dozen of our native birds; they have very definite ideas about what will be acceptable habitat. you’d better get to Bunnings and but a heap of tools!

    https://www.birdsinbackyards.net/Nest-Box-Plans

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Yvonne Says:

    I hope some birds take up your offer for public housing.

    This link will give you plans for a dozen of our native birds; they have very definite ideas about what will be acceptable habitat. you’d better get to Bunnings and but a heap of tools!

    https://www.birdsinbackyards.net/Nest-Box-Plans

    PS You look very woebegone with your pirate patch!

    Liked by 1 person

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      Wow, a double reward for my bird box. You gave me a terrific website and it turns out my box is too small for the Rozella. Never mind I can install several boxes and have the money to indulge the birds a bit with social housing.
      My eyesight is better than ever and the patch has now gone.
      Thank you Yvonne.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. algernon1 Says:

    Gerard, I assume your eye is now patch free. How is the sight. I’m amazed with mine and looking forward to the second op on Friday.

    Liked by 2 people

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      So far only one eye and I was at first panic stricken, phoned the surgeon but he calmed me and said it will take some time. He was right, the next day I saw normal and better than before. I deliberately now drive around flaunting my new eyesight by not wearing glasses.
      Heaven only knows when I get my other eye done!
      Glad your operation was successful too, Algy.

      Liked by 2 people

  5. Alien Resort Says:

    You could get a pirate patch.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Therese Trouserzoff Says:

    I reckon you and Algy are really brave, Gez.

    The mere thought of someone taking a stiletto to my peepers chills me to the bone. Worse still, you’re not able to look the other way are you !!

    Good luck and a speedy recovery-er :-). Emm & FM.’ Ur

    As for the birdies, here in the Great Inner West we have the luxury of a rainforest that FM planted 28 years ago. We get lots of birds visiting. The vicious packs of Mynahs do not impress the Currawongs and they in turn cut no ice with the Magpies. The latter are adept at using washing for target practice.

    It’s amazing how the mynahs, currawongs and magpies all loathe and fear the crows, form possies and harass them till they fly the coop.

    We have the pleasure of the company of top knot pigeons from time to time. They are the noisiest flyers.

    Our favourites are the Lorikeets – good-natured Bonvivants in their stunning finery having leisurely repasts in the palms, native frangipani, pinwheel proteas and the bottlebrushes – talking the whole time.

    We have even hosted a few kookaburras and blue kingfishers, but sadly the birds formerly known as the rats of the air – the sparrows or as my Dad used to call them, the spadgers haven’t been seen here since the big predators came in from the Bush with the millennial drought.

    Speaking of which, although we neither feed nor House birdies They do seem particularly fond of the ponds and the birdbath !

    Kind regards, Emm.

    Liked by 3 people

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      Not only brave, Trouserzoff, but defying those hollow eyed doomsayers predicting that it sends you blind and all will end up in hellish fires. Mum was wrong and so was father Riley in the confessional. Au contraire; IT IMPOVES SIGHT as far as I can tell.
      I am not going to stop now and advice the same to all the Pub converts. Age shall not weary them!

      As for the birds, it is early days and one of the most needed items are for the box (es) to have trees surrounding it for birds to perch on. Even though I bought a lot of trees, they are now bare and mere saplings. The soil is rock-hard and I also have a large underground water tank that collects the rain and helps water my garden and flushes all the three toilets. I do not want to punch a hole in this tank and I am not sure of their exact underground position. I might have to buy some more mature trees in large oak barrels. I have seen them!

      As for the corellas, they are funny birds to watch, the best clowns ever as they cavort and roll around, obviously totally impervious to Father Riley’s sermons. Nature at its best!

      Liked by 1 person

  7. rangewriter Says:

    Be patient with your birdie box. It took 15 years for the chickadees to discover mine. Of course, maybe it was the occasional cat prowling the backyard that kept the birds from my birdhouse. But even so, she’s been gone for 2 years. Maybe having a supply of food overhead will prompt quicker residency.

    I’m glad your surgery is behind you and I hope the result was stellar.

    Liked by 1 person

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      Time is on my side but fifteen years and I will be 94, it is very likely the way I feel now with my new eyesight.
      Some Rosellas have visited my place already and that was before the installation of the bird box. I suppose birds will start to feel romantic soon and begin to date each other or at least start eyeing each other a bit more.
      Come spring and they will look for suitable nests and I hope they will consider mine. I am so looking forward to my garden and some birds.
      My eyesight is stellar indeed, such a surprise. Not wearing glasses when driving. I feel like tooting my horn!
      Thank you.

      Like

      • rangewriter Says:

        I can imagine how you feel about those peepers. The eyes, I mean. About 15 years ago I had lasik surgery to correct my vision. The delight of being able to look up at night and see the stars without fumbling for glasses while camping…I’m still over the moon about that.

        Liked by 1 person

  8. Curt Mekemson Says:

    We have two families making their homes here now, Gerard: Tree swallows and wrens. Much fun watching both of them. Their babies have just now hatched.
    Around here I had to get a bird feeder that accommodates smaller but not the bigger birds. Like you, we would have been eaten out of house and home. I managed to stop the pigeons who would clean up a week’s worth of food in 20 minutes but Jays— they are clever birds— have figured out how to use the small feeder. They just can’t stuff themselves with 20 sunflower seeds at a time. 🙂 –Curt

    Liked by 1 person

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      Yes, Curt. I realise I have to set the birds’ housing to their sizes. Even though there are lots of trees adjacent to the railway-line they are across the road and my garden is just starting to take off. Yesterday I bought a Manchurian pear tree and am in the process of planting it near where I am hoping the birds will congregate together with three birch trees and another native American tree whose name escapes me.
      A couple of Rosellas have visited the bird seed tray and gingerly reconnoitred the surroundings.
      Patience is needed.

      Like

      • Curt Mekemson Says:

        We don’t have Rosellas around here Greard since they are an Australian birds but they certainly are pretty. Good luck with attracting them. Sounds like you are doing what is necessary! Food and shelter… –Curt

        Like

  9. catterel Says:

    Glad your eye op was successful – isn’t it wonderful to see even better than before? I’m wondering if it’s a good idea to have that chimney right beneath the bird box – they might like the warmth, but the smoke? Anyway, good luck – I hope you soon have tenants.

    Liked by 2 people

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      I am not burning anything anymore in that chimney and now use it to put the bird seed tray on top.
      I love looking outside hoping to see them arrive, Am not suppose to do anything to strain my eyes so, don’t feel guilty sitting around a bit.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. auntyuta Says:

    I am glad, Gerard, you are so happy with your much improved eyesight. Some time ago I cancelled an application for a cataract OP. The eye specialist recommended that I apply again, but so far I have not done it. Being blind in one eye, I am scared something might go wrong with my ‘good’ eye. Since I am 85, I just hope that my good eye may last for the bit of time that maybe is still left to me. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  11. shoreacres Says:

    I think I must have shared my post about my own cataract surgery when you first began thinking about yours. I’m so glad you’re done now. You’re right that it’s become one of the safest surgeries going. It’s been at least three years or even four since mine were done, and I’m still problem free and seeing as well as I did just after.

    I laughed at the azaleas plopped inside the white-painted tires. That’s akin to geraniums in an old toilet. That doesn’t fly with most of the homeowners’ associations these days, but it was common enough when I was a kid. Sometimes, people went upscale and planted in an old washtub.

    It took some time for the birds to show up once I put out the feeders. I didn’t get any for about three weeks. Then, little by little, they came. Now I have several species: bluejays, finches, chickadees, doves, starlings, and the very occasional hawk who’s looking for something a little more substantial than millet or sunflower seed. They’re so entertaining — I know you’ll enjoy them.

    Liked by 1 person

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      I have had success with birds and the first of the Rosella have visited twice already. I put in another larger nesting box as the first one would only house finches or sparrows. ‘Only sparrows’ is a bit mean. I love sparrows, they are quite funny and can be very brazen.
      When Helvi and I on our walk would stop at the local pie shop the sparrows would gather around us eating the crumbs that fell on the ground. They would quickly dart in and out between our feet. Milo was intrigued as well and used to watch them with great interest.

      Like

  12. doesitevenmatter3 Says:

    Love your bird box!!!
    Birds add such joy and beauty to our lives!!!
    Hope your eye is healed by now!
    I remember after my mom had that surgery, she kept saying, “The colors are so much brighter now!” 🙂
    (((HUGS))) 🙂
    PS…I was AWOL, but like The Terminator, ” I’ll be bach!” and now, I’m back. I explained in a blog I just now blogged. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

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