The incorrigible Jack.

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Milo.

You can tell that the above Jack Russell dog is one of the most intelligent breeds of mammals around. This particular one is our dog Milo, so that explains my prejudice, but just have a good look at him. He exudes wisdom and a certain clear-sightedness of the world that he, together with billons of other creatures, shares with lesser mammals, the human variety. It has been known for a long time by some scientists the truth that the humans are now belonging to an inferior placenta mammal whose lack of intelligence made them introduce bows and arrows, nuclear bombs and endless wars with an innate desire to kill their own species. Some of those mammals belong to a special sub-species named poli-tic-ions, some of whom eat lumps of coal, are now busy resisting climate change of which most normal intelligent mammals are now acutely aware of and indeed have been trying to point the verity of climate change to the less intelligence endowed mammals for years…

The recent bushfires in Australia are responsible that over a billion animals have now perished. The cause of those fires are now well known to have been part of ignoring what the world of the more advanced mammals (phylum chordata) have been pointing out to the lower human mammals for years. Thus on a worldview, human mammals are just shown to be much lower on the evolutionary scale than the much more evolved mammals such as the koala, the kangaroo and of course the Jack Russell. Humans are not fundamentally different from mammals according to an evolutionary worldview, but certainly less evolved…

“The world’s species and habitats are under more severe pressure than at any time in human history. Over 10,000 tree species are threatened with extinction, as are almost 8,000 species of bird, mammal, reptile, amphibian and fish. The number one contributor to this alarming state of affairs is habitat loss, all of it driven by human activities, but the problem is compounded by unsustainable exploitation in all its forms. This collective mismanagement of our planet’s resources is leading to widespread declines in biodiversity and driving increasing numbers of species to the brink.”

https://www.fauna-flora.org/approaches/species-and-habitats

 

This is what the  human mammal is thriving for unless it changes course!

This morning while having a coffee with friends I took this photo of Milo and his girlfriend. You can tell they are a good couple. Milo is now almost sixteen years and Helvi and I used to wager who would go first. Sadly, Helvi did, and my morning coffees at the Bradman cricket Café named suitably ‘The Stumps’ are a real treat with good friends and they help to get used to the new situation of my quiet house, silent mornings and single plate at the sink.

 

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Milo and girlfriend. They are both great companions.

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34 Responses to “The incorrigible Jack.”

  1. berlioz1935 Says:

    It is a mystery to me how human beings, through a system called ‘democracy’, can elect rulers who are even dumber than themselves? Thinking must be an evolutionary mistake because our brain can construct an argument based on wrong premisses. People who are best at it are the subspecies you are calling ‘poli-tic-ions’.

    Having met Milo I can attest to his superior wisdom to the many people who live on this planet. His quietness is proof that words are often willfully misunderstood. So why waste words?

    Liked by 5 people

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      Yes, it is now normal for the pol-it-tic-ions to deny what animals and nature have been pointing out for many years. But they seem to think that ‘consume till you die’ will continue. Once we grasp the concept that we die irrespective of consuming, that the alarm bell might go off.

      The young are now giving the elderly a bit of hope. Milo knows and understands. Many now stoop down and look in his eyes and some find an answer.

      Only this morning an old man patted Milo who reassured him by a lick of his tongue, things will turn out alright and that we mustn’t lose faith. He was so grateful, he wiped a tear away from gratitude.

      Liked by 3 people

  2. auntyuta Says:

    Some people are in denial about a lot of things, and they say that this state of affairs is still quite ‘normal’ and we can cope with it, but how can anyone deny that the ‘number one contributor to this alarming state of affairs is habitat loss’?
    Really, can you call this amount of habitat loss ‘normal’ and the exploitation in all its forms for our wonderful living standard normal and sustainable?

    Liked by 4 people

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      Yes, Uta. Things are perplexing and so gone awry. How could we have got it so wrong and yet animals and nature keep telling us to mend our ways.
      I saw on TV that the people in Bangla Dash are now planting trees to counteract the depletion of fresh air due to not enough forests able to convert carbon into oxygen.
      What’s wrong with Australian pol-I-tic-ions?

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Yvonne Says:

    Who remembers those old movies with Laurel and Hardy, and the catch phrase “This is a fine mess you got us into Ollie.”? We are crying “This is a fine mess you’ve got us into, greedy homo sapiens.”

    Liked by 3 people

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      Yes, we loved those movies. Swedish companies, I just read, are offering credits to employees who will shun air-travel. Some countries are progressive and some just wallow in the past longing for gruel and boiled lard.

      Liked by 2 people

  4. doesitevenmatter3 Says:

    Milo and his girlfriend are a beautiful couple! 🙂 What is her name?!

    Just thinking about all the animals that perished in the fires makes me weep. 😦

    I think human-beans are less evolved than animals. I don’t know about all animals…but dogs are for sure more compassionate, intelligent, loyal, kind, friendly, etc., than many human-beans. And it seems some human-beans are de-evolving. (If that’s a word.) What I mean is they are going down instead of up…in the wrong direction. And seem to want to drag everyone else with them. 😦

    HUGS to you, Gerard!!!
    RUBS and PATS to Milo!!!

    Liked by 1 person

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      Yes, they got on after just one sniff around their bottoms and became instantly good friends. Milo is castrated but I noticed he was still getting a bit of a twinge AND he is 16 years old. Amazing. She is a good girls though and after a sniff too, sat down modestly but with a bit of coyness.

      Yes, we human beans are not doing too well and our lives , especially the young, are in jeopardy if we don’t stop this climate change. In Europe they seem to now grab the bull by the horns and a trillion is set aside to try and convert their economies to a more sustainable level.

      It has been suggested that our Reserve Bank in Australia should consider buying up coal mines and decommission them. A brilliant idea. We employ about 80 000 people in the mining industry but close to a million in the tourism industry. That tells us something.

      Hugs to you Carolyn and Cooper.

      Liked by 2 people

      • doesitevenmatter3 Says:

        Sweet on Milo and his girlfriend! 🙂
        Cooper is not quite as old as Milo…but Coop is getting up there in age. Coop has a stuffed-animal girlfriend that I bought him a few days before he adopted me at 6 weeks old. He is fixed, but he used to hump her every night after his dinner. These days he still humps her two or three nights a week. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • gerard oosterman Says:

        Cooper is some dog, humping a stuffed animal nightly? And after his dinner? What do you give him? I don’t know if Milo will ever reach that sort of level. I am almost getting excited myself.

        Milo sleeps next to me on the floor and I always have to be careful not to step on him going to the bathroom. He looks up and acknowledges me, which is rather sweet.

        No hugging or humping at all, but I do have the nicest memories.

        Like

      • freefall852 Says:

        “Humping a stuffed animal”…..hmm….I wonder if we can get an opinion on such a frenzied action from George Christensen’s partner?

        Like

  5. photofinlandrantasalot.wordpress.com Says:

    A great post, how we destroy our planet, everything. So true, and I think nothing can stop it.
    Milo and his girlfriend are so cute.

    Liked by 2 people

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      Yes, it is terrible but at least in Finland people are more aware and they seem to have a government willing to tackle the problem of climate change. Perhaps I am biased seeing I was married to a very progressive Finnish girl for 54 years.
      She used to get so furious about Australia and it’s stance on climate change AND how refugees were treated.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. petspeopleandlife Says:

    It is nice that Milo has a lady friend. Dogs enjoy companionship as much as humans. It looks as if you are doing a bit better and maybe getting out more? Anyway dogs are a nice conversation starter if you are in the right place with like minded individuals.

    Habitat loss is world wide and at the pace we are on- it is likely just a matter of time before the entire planet is ruined. How can it be otherwise when humans continue to reproduce and multiply at an alarming rate? So many houses and vehicles- loss of land to build more houses, businesses, factories, and so on. Land in my state of Texas is disappearing to make room for hotels, football stadiums, entertainment complexes, restaurants- you name and it is erected on prime farm land. I see it all around a town of a mere 120,000 or so, It is disgusting and depressing.

    Population growth needs to be curtailed and i know that many people cringe at the idea but world leaders had better wake before it is too late.

    Liked by 2 people

    • berlioz1935 Says:

      I agree with you wholeheartedly. Here too arable land is disappearing at an alarming rate under deöopement sites.

      I can see, that humans will in future live in artificial environments as nature will have been destroyed. And future politicians will call this shamelessly progress.

      Liked by 2 people

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      Yes, Thank you, Yvonne. I am doing a bit better. Met some nice people at the local café who are not demonising Muslims, refugees, Lebanese or Chinese. A bit of fresh air.
      They too bring their dogs, so Milo is besides himself with so many friends as well. He hasn’t humped any other dog as yet so far. But, I do give him parts of my cheese and ham croissant.

      I was back at my bowling club today but within a few minutes out came the remarks about how ‘the lefties are ruining the country.’
      Snide remarks about Rumanians etc.

      Here a lot of land is being taken up by sub-divisions. But. This is changing where many people seem to want to live where they work and where schools, hospitals, shops and other infrastructures are within walking distance.

      I guess that the US is similar to Australia where people actually don’t live in the towns or cities but around them which makes driving a car to get the newspaper or a bottle of milk, a necessity.

      Liked by 1 person

      • petspeopleandlife Says:

        To answer your question or your thoughts, yes, there are no really any corner stores-just what we call convenience stores and those are confined to main arteries of my town and along highways. There are no neighborhood stores except those in the poorer area of my town on the other side of the river, Folks that have no vehicle can be seen walking or riding a bicycle to some of the convenience stores that also sell gas and where you can air the tires of your vehicle. Other than that folks just don’t walk to the store.. It is not safe because most areas have no sidewalks and my town has its share of thugs that will rob you for a mere dollar. So if you run out of bread or milk, chips, soda or lunch meat then off you go to the convenience store. Personally I make it a point to never run out of anything. I am always stocked up and if something is lacking then I wait until the next day and go to what is called, “My Friendly HEB.” So folks that have vehicles just never walk to the store. That is unheard of and I don’t know of one single soul that walks to the store.

        Liked by 1 person

      • gerard oosterman Says:

        I looked up Friendly HEB but I received Hebrew but after some persistence I got that they are a chain of Texan convenience store or supermarkets. Here one does see some people walking to the local stores. But most drive. Lately very large vehicles are now being driven. Some are very impersonating and look menacing, as if to say; don’t muck around with me buddy, or I will teach you a lesson. I suppose they have them in Texas too.

        Like

  7. Andrew Says:

    What a poignant post. All that you say is true but having Milo as a companion is some modest consolation for man’s inhumanity towards man. Never be without a faithful dog. Milo must miss Helvi too but I’m glad he has a girlfriend.

    Like

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      Yes, Milo is still the centre of attention at the café together with more dogs. He does miss Helvi and keeps looking at the bedroom especially when I sometimes talk to myself. He thinks Helvi will appear and answer me.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Julia Lund Says:

    My mother had two Sheltie Collies, barely more than pups when my father died. Mum always said that it was the dogs that during the early months and years of her grief gave her a reason to get up in the morning and maintain some sort of rhythm of living. I’m glad you have Milo. And that Milo has a girlfriend. And you, of course.

    Liked by 1 person

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      Yes, you are right, Julia, about maintaining some kind of rhythm in life. I am actively seeking domestic chores, even to the point of making some up. Like coiling up the garden hose, or folding very neatly the bedsheets after they have been washed and dried. I could just as easily just roll the sheets in a bundle and chuck them in the cupboards.
      It helps to have a pet, especially a Jack Russell who demands walks and company with others. He now knows he gets part pf my cheese and ham croissant at the Café and just about runs to the place. His girlfriend is there too, but I suspect he want the croissant more.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. freefall852 Says:

    Had a few Jack Russells myself back in the old days…spunky little beasts..take on anything….Had an human alpha male batchelor over the back of our house block in those days who owned a staffy pit-bull that he used to provoke until it was downright dangerous to approach…I’d go to the wire fence to call out to the neighblur and it’d fly at me teeth bared and salivating…real bastard of a dog!
    One day, I’m in the study and suddenly there’s this almighty fracas of a dog-fight going on in the kitchen area of the house…the back door was accidently left open and that neighbour’s staffy had found its way inside and our two russells (mother and daughter) were going for it!…The staffy turning this way and that trying to keep them off…then I saw what was the equivalent of a blinding pincer movement worthy of Napoleon’s Grande Armee in his glory days!..
    The two Jack Russells sprung at the staffy from opposite ends and latched on simultaneously the diagnally opposite front and back legs and brought the staffy down on his back, where upon some sort of universal doggy signal they simultaneously leapt at the staffy’s vulnerable parts, flying through the air, all four legs akimbo like a kid doing a belly-flop in the local pool, but with those long,vicious russell teeth bared and snarling and coming in like a hellfire missile!…the staffy took a couple of hits and was flying out the back door from whence it came howling like a vanquished banshee…never to cross the thresh-hold again!
    A complete and wonderful victory for the Russell breed that has gone down in history along with many glorious moments on the battlefield!
    Spunky breed, the russells…

    Liked by 1 person

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      Yes, they are brave, Jo. Milo is rather docile with most dogs but sometimes he will go for a much bigger dog as if he still wants to prove he is not to be fooled around with. Some of those bigger dogs don’t mind and look a bit bemused.
      Pit bull or Staffy terriers are often the ones who seem to attack people and children and yet there are those who say that the owners are at fault. However, if that breed comes up so often with biting, I reckon action has to be taken and ban the breeding of them.
      Glad your Jackies got the better of that one though. Yes, they are fearless.

      Like

  10. rangewriter Says:

    A great tribute to the poor mammals we are murdering with our stupidity. It’s not enough that we murder our own kind, but we also usher abrupt and massive extinctions of the wiser beings while we’re at it.

    I hope Milo continues to be another being in your household for a good long time. What a cutie he is. When I settle down to have a dog, I’d like to have one just like him. I had a black & white short haired Fox Terrier mix as a child. I loved that guy. His name was Willie. Don’t ask me why that was his name. That was a long time ago and I was quite young and if I ever knew, I’ve completely forgotten now.

    Liked by 1 person

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      Yes, I think our Milo is the best dog we ever had, he is almost 16 but still a pup at heart. He now is cunning enough to take me to the local café where other people and many dogs congregate each morning. A nice beginning of the day and Milo knows he is guaranteed to get treats from the other dog owners.

      At some stage I will go on a trip somewhere, perhaps Finland? I am advised to get someone living in our house who will look after Milo. I am told this is very popular and ideal for the dog. A dog sitter and a house sitter combined. It sound good.

      Like

      • rangewriter Says:

        Yes, when I had my dear Poppy cat, who died at 18 a couple of summers ago, I always hired a house sitter to keep her company. And the side benefit is having someone in the house so it’s not so vulnerable to pranksters. But here in America it is costly to get a good house sitter. Poppy was my tether, bless her sweet heart.

        Liked by 1 person

      • gerard oosterman Says:

        Sorry to hear about poppy. I can’t bear to think about Milo going. He is almost 16 years old but as agile as ever. He does sleep a bit more than usual.
        Here in Australia some pay but others tell me they get sitters very happy to live for free somewhere.

        Like

  11. shoreacres Says:

    It’s good that Milo has a friend now, too. And if you were to travel, having someone to tend to him as well as the house would be good. I think dogs do better in boarding facilities than cats, but there’s a lot of security in being in familiar surroundings. I always had someone come in to care for Dixie Rose, rather than boarding her. Granted, most of the time the kitty sitter found her hiding under the bed, but at least it was a familiar bed to hide under.

    Liked by 1 person

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      Yes, our neighbour used a per loving house sitter who was found locally on a website. It worked fine, and from upstairs I could see the girl rolling around with the dogs. The loved her.
      Milo did not like the dog kennels and would be very upset when we left him there, looking back as if to say, ‘how can you do that to me?’ We always left his favourite pillow with kennel, but that isn’t the same as sleeping with the family.

      Like

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