Thomas’ university entrance score.

photo Thomas without tablet

without tablet (de)vice

The magic of the internet showed up again when our grandson, Thomas, managed to receive his HSC scores through the manipulation of his iPhone. The magic isn’t so remarkable while within range of civilisation, but in the middle of Sulawesi jungle? Mind you, once tourism rolls in, the www’s follows. We have both been able to ‘message’ each other which, as I have been told, is different from texting. I can never get my head around all that technical stuff. It is a penalty I am glad to pay. You won’t see the likes of us, old fogeys, heads bend over iPhones in one hand and cappuccino in the other, while crossing the street with giant semi-trailers roaring past, missing us by mere inches.

Thomas worked very hard. He is not a practical boy with two left hands unable to clean up or acknowledge a laundry basket even remotely. He used to visit us when things got too much back at home. His teenage years weren’t spared and as his grandparents we used to counsel him assiduously with pearls of wisdom coming from his mother more than me.  I still get admonished for not putting the butter back in the fridge in its predetermined space. I have watched Thomas doing the dishes at our place and had to smile at his awkwardness. I actually had to restrain myself in not encouraging his clumsiness. He put plates and cups standing up and would at times just walk away. He is somewhat of a dreamer and easily distracted by his own thoughts, whatever they might be. Thoughts are the stuff of life, and to be encouraged even if it doesn’t fit in with domestic chores or logic. Of course, our daughter does get fed up with her son’s chaotic habits and domestic clutter. Not that she is all that organised. Perhaps the reason of her annoyance! Thomas got his mother’s genes.

When Thomas was small around 5 or 6 years of age he used to wander around our farm’ paddock just reading. Helvi used to do the same when she was young, she told me.  His younger brother raced around the house on his bike which Thomas had difficulty mastering. He thought that by pushing the handlebars this would somehow propel the bike forward. It wasn’t till I took the trouble explaining the mechanics of pedalling with his feet activating  a chain for a wheel to turn that he finally got going on his bike. While his younger brother plays and watches sport, including soccer at 3am in the morning, Thomas could not get quick enough away from any sporting activity. It is amazing how the two grandsons are so different. You should see how organized his younger brother is. His room always spotless!

Thomas was over the moon and so were his mother and us. He scored 93 out of a top score of 99. For a complicated reason the top score is not 100.  The world of further study is now open. He tells us he might want to get a job for a years or so, save up, and see more of the world. His mum would have been happy with a score of 75 or so. You can just imagine her joy. (And ours) All credit to him though, he worked so hard.

 

 

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34 Responses to “Thomas’ university entrance score.”

  1. shoreacres Says:

    I’m so happy for Thomas — that’s quite an accomplishment. I also enjoyed your description of the two boys, and their differences.I’m always surprised by how greatly siblings can differ. I know such things only second-hand, of course, being an only child, but it’s interesting to observe.

    I wanted to take a year off after I graduated from high school, but it wasn’t to be. I would have been much better off. I’d started school early, at four years of age, and was only sixteen when I headed off to college. A little more travel or work would have profited me.

    Liked by 2 people

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      Starting school at 4 years is amazing, Linda. I suppose if one includes kindergartens then that would include Australia. I went to a Montessori pre-school during the ww 2 in Rotterdam when I was 4years or so.

      Helvi was taught to read by her older siblings before she went to any school. That’s how it was. She hasn’t stopped reading ever since. It is rare that she doesn’t find a book somehow and somewhere, mainly pre-loved from charity shops. There is an avalanche of books next to her side of the bed.

      Liked by 2 people

      • shoreacres Says:

        Our first year was kindgergarten, too. I turned five during that first fall. Like Helvi, I already was reading, thanks to my parents. Mom read to me all the time, and I got to “read” the newspaper with Dad most days. Exposure’s the key, that’s for sure. Well, exposure and encouragement.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Issa Dioume Says:

    Congratulations to Thomas! He must be overjoyed!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Julia Lund Says:

    Well done, Thomas! And to all of you for the years well-invested in this young man’s life. He will reap the benefits of this legacy in the years to come.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Dorothy Says:

    Well done Thomas

    Liked by 1 person

  5. rangewriter Says:

    Congratulations to Thomas. May the next steps in his life be worthy of the work he has put toward this achievement.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. doesitevenmatter3 Says:

    Congrats to Thomas! OH, I am so happy for him! I know he must’ve worked so hard. 🙂
    And congrats to his mum and to you and Helvi and others who have been there for him with love and support! 🙂
    I wish Thomas well in his life! YAY, Thomas! 🙂
    (((HUGS))) 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      We will see what happens next. Teenage kids have a hard time. In the past they could make pocket money by collecting bottles or delivering newspapers and there were jobs galore. There were milk and bread runs. Not anymore now.
      I used to strip lead from window sills around town in Holland. A bit of thief then. But it kept me in pocket money which my parents could never afford.

      Liked by 1 person

      • doesitevenmatter3 Says:

        Yes, it’s a tough world for the kids today. And here it seems a lot of adults need, and are hired to do, the jobs teenagers used to do.

        I started getting paid to baby-sit by the age of 12. By age 15 I had a go-to get-paid with a pay check job at a preschool. I helped care for kids who were 18 months to 4 years of age. At that job my pay was $1.25 an hour. 🙂 I worked there during summers, after school each year through graduation of 12th grade. And then one summer in college I came back home and got hired there to work a summer again. 🙂

        Like

  7. Curt Mekemson Says:

    Always good to see the kids and grandkids succeeding, Gerard. It certainly isn’t a given. –Curt

    Liked by 1 person

  8. freefall852 Says:

    Having just got back online aftera virus attack on my computer that blocked the “boot- startup”…whatever the hell THAT is…besides the obvious…I can sympathise with others distrust of this new age of techy stuff…..But what REALLY, REALLY gives me the screaming heebie jeebies is the “tech-talk” language when you go to find out what went wrong and how to fix it…You immediately run into these things called ; “BIOS”….I think…and if you do get lucky and by holding down the F2 button as you push the power-on button and this “window” opens and a a host of options become available you are tricked into thinking..”You little beauty!..this will fix it!”….but then you are given the options of a number of undecipherable anagrams and codes that mean nothing to anyone but a graduate of Bletchley Park or some psychopathic serial killer like we see on such Nordic Noir films!!….I give up!

    Liked by 1 person

    • freefall852 Says:

      And to add to the above..I suspect it is only a matter of time before these Techy-talk graduates become the new “Sharmins” of the age…being the only ones who can perform the “magic” that gets the computer stuff up and running again.

      But even now, having got my computer back from the technican..I can feel it’s not “MY” computer anymore…he’s done something to it..and I am suspicious of it…I really don’t know who is in control of whom anymore…I have stuck the bit of electrical tape over the camera at the top of the screen…but I can still “feel” it is watching me………..
      I-am-going-outside-now……..(I may be gone a little while)….

      Liked by 1 person

      • auntyuta Says:

        I did not know what a ‘sparkie’ is and looked it up. So it is an electrician, right?
        I would not advise that some one being very academically minded to become a tradie. If he is not very good with his hands, why should he want to become a tradie? Just to earn more money? Forget it, I’d say.
        I wish Thomas all the best for his academic career!

        Like

      • freefall852 Says:

        Uta…I have been a carpenter tradie all my working life…I am not a big person…and though I am not of the academic type, I have done work for MANY of that class and I have found that as they get older, they have a kind of envy…the male ones at least…of being able to do things with the hands..so that at the end of the day you have an actual..a tactile thing you can touch, feel and perhaps admire as testament of your labour…money does not come into it…it is the “making of something” I believe.

        Liked by 2 people

    • freefall852 Says:

      On Thomas…..advise him to become a tradie plumber or sparkie..it’ll give him the best chance at a balanced life.

      Liked by 1 person

      • gerard oosterman Says:

        Good advice, Jo. That’s where the money is, for sure. A bit of waving the silicone tube around the place here and there for a few minutes. That will be $300.- thank you.

        Like

      • freefall852 Says:

        Plus, as a tradie in either of those occupations, your job is protected by Govt’ authorised licencensing…and so you can organise your work time around your own favoured calendar.

        Like

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      It annoys me too, Jo. I get those irritating messages that give a ‘ping’ sound on my iPhone. It frightens me. ‘What disaster is happening now’ , is what jumps up in my befuddled mind. I so much want peace and quiet.
      What use are those updates we seem to get? I still pay most of my shopping in cash. Don’t trust any of that tapping business.
      I never skype or tweet. Heaven knows from whose mouth those words are coming from.

      Like

      • freefall852 Says:

        Yes..and my daughter rang and asked me what I wanted to say in that last text message I sent her…because..:
        “I couldn’t understand the words you used.”
        “Oh” I replied sarcastically ..”you mean the English language?”…the irony went right over her head..
        ” yes..it was in all that old talk.”

        Liked by 2 people

    • auntyuta Says:

      Of course, you’re right, Joe, ‘the making of something’ is very important to a lot of people and may become even more important for the elderly. I used to dislike washing dishes a lot when I was younger. But now in my old age I enjoy washing dishes a lot for this is the one thing I can do with my hands reasonable well, and sometimes it can be even a bit like a meditation for me! 🙂

      Like

  9. gerard oosterman Says:

    Have you tried using ‘stuff like that’ or even ‘awesome’ in your text message, Jo?

    Like

  10. freefall852 Says:

    Gerard…My biggest mistake in choosing a career was to become a carpenter…THAT places you in the category of : “Useful Person”…ie; you can put your hand to most building situations, being usually the first on the job (setting out foundations) and the last to leave (fixing the door locks and handing over the keys) and so you get to pick the brains of all the other trades that come on the job…..It’s failing is that whenever you attend a social event like family BBQ’s…you get sought out to give advice on pagolas, extensions and maintenance advice….While your cousin, who became a lazy lawyer, when asked advice just replies…: “Make an appoinyment with my receptionist.”

    Liked by 2 people

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      That is true. Being a carpenter is a no-no at BBQs nor announcing one is a doctor. Best is to say one’s profession is a quantity surveyor or an actuary. Of course, at our age one has to assiduously avoid announcing one is a funeral director. Next you will be asked for a discounted quote on dear old uncle Bob or Mrs Murphy who have just passed away.

      Liked by 2 people

  11. ROHIT SHARMA Says:

    Congratulations
    🎉🎉🎉🎉🎉🎉

    Like

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