Moleskins, Aged care and Alzheimer.

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It had to happen. A small tear in my moleskin trousers rapidly spread into a big one. From below the knee up to my thighs. This pair of moleskins lasted for more than twenty years. Helvi remembers buying them from the RM Williams store in Bowral in 1995. It was the year before we moved to the farm. The Australian RM Williams moleskins are the quintessential for farmwear. They are snake proof, even shark-proof. I never heard a shark taking someone wearing those moleskins. They are warm in winter and once worn- in, very comfortable during summer. The moleskin, like their boots, are not cheap but they last. I am still wearing the boots. I did send them away to their factory in Adelaide to get the bottom part renewed.

I promptly bought another identical pair of moleskins yesterday. Helvi said; ‘they will see you out!’ It wasn’t an unreasonable assumption! I combined the buying of the moleskins with an appointment with the audiologist and a thorough hearing test. I have become deaf. The latest movie we saw ‘The ladies in Black’ was beyond my hearing and most of it had to be guessed with the missing bits filled in by Helvi. Within my indoor-bowling groups I am not following conversation anymore. I am not too bothered by that with most of conversation by talk of football and Roosters. When they laugh so do I. I thought Rooster was a male chicken and as I was feeding the chickens next door tried to join in and enter the talk. It turned out a Rooster is a football club. I told the audiologist I don’t mind spending big money if it eases the situation when with Helvi. It is a bummer for her to keep repeating herself.  She doesn’t deserve that. As you can see, ageing has its problems.

We watched the second episode of the ABC’s ‘Aged- Care’.  One reason for feeling a bit sombre today. Dear, oh dear!  More bashings of the elderly and frail, all caught on cameras. It turns out that installing cameras in aged care facilities is a legal minefield.  The main problem is lack of qualified staff and understaffing. Even so, where is the empathy and understanding by our health minister who seemed to want to make light of it. Is this why we also don’t really mind the keeping in detention of over a hundred children, now in its fifth year on Nauru? We have a PM who is religious, yet he was the architect of detention of children with his ‘stop the boats’ policy.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-09-25/secret-surveillance-cameras-in-grandmas-nursing-home-legal/10298834

And finally a news item on Alzheimer whereby it is suggested that the plaque on braincells is a result of Alzheimer but not necessarily the cause. They are looking for volunteers to take part in trials. I was glad to read that testosterone and oestrogen boosting  fish oil might well be preventing Alzheimer. I always thought that eating herrings, sardines and anchovies was the way forward. I might well take a tin of sardines to the cinema next time.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-09-25/alzheimers-disease-research-questions-plaque-as-cause-of-disease/10299514

I am so happy with my new moleskins!

 

 

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29 Responses to “Moleskins, Aged care and Alzheimer.”

  1. leggypeggy Says:

    Poor John got hear aids about 18 months ago and they’ve made a huge difference.

    Liked by 2 people

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      I forgot to say, I have had hearing aids for many years. The impairment inherited from my mother’s side. It hasn’t been too bad but gradually it has got worse. I am hoping that improved high technology will allow me to get the best available.
      I now watch TV with text only. Fortunately our latest binging on Scandic noir movies on SBS has been a boon with English subtitles.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. petspeopleandlife Says:

    Gerard, as you have written. old age is not a picnic nor for the faint hearted. I see age as a constant struggle. Doctor appointments and not just one MD but, by George, I have, more than a few. I must see a different MD for each aliment. In the past 8 years or so, I have actually been to seven or eight MDs and that does not include an acupuncturist and a chiropractor.

    By Jove if I can manage all the MDs that I have seen in the past eight years, then I should be very healthy or nearly dead. As luck will have it, I am in pretty good heath with the help of all the physicians.

    Dementia of any kind is no laughing matter. Thus far I am doing pretty good in that arena. I drive and keep up with the traffic and I can still compose a sentence and spell and remember my name. Dementia is something to be feared, for sure

    I think that as long as you stay active and write your blog and eat healthy, then you are good to go for 20 plus years. Now get the hearing aides.

    Liked by 2 people

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      Yes, no picnic getting old, Ivonne. On the other hand, one of the benefits is that we can let go of many things. We can stop worrying about having to achieve anything and just enjoy the moment.
      Easier said than done, but I don’t have to catch the 6.30 am bus to go to the factory or the office. My hearing is dodgy but all that chatter and noise is now gone. The silence of the background is giving serenity.
      I don’t often see the MD except for my driver’s license physical or a thyroxine script to renew.
      You are right and the skill to string words together is keeping dementia at bay.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. lifecameos Says:

    I think I have escaped Mum’s Alzheimers so far, but my hearing seems dodgy – it is not great in everyday life.

    Liked by 1 person

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      Lack of hearing is a bummer. I try and guess what people are saying when talking to me. They say one should just spell out that one has difficulty with hearing but one sometimes don’t want people to keep repeating their words and…some people have a problem with speaking clearly. The young often talk locomotively with little or no intonation or pitch variation. And that is apart from others that just talk with their lips shut tight in case flies get in.
      It’s not easy.

      Liked by 3 people

  4. doesitevenmatter3 Says:

    Yes, getting well-seasoned (I refuse to use the word older) is not for sissies or wimps. 🙂

    YAY for your new moleskins! You are of sharp/smart mind, good wit, positive attitude, etc…I know you can outlive those new moleskins! 🙂

    Alzheimers is such a sad cruel disease. 😦

    I enjoy tins of fish and fresh fish and seafood! Take fermented herrings to the movies and everyone will be jealous of your snack! Maybe take along a slice of Limburger cheese, too!

    HUGS for you and Helvi! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      My new moleskins are superb. I walk around town twice now and love the feel of them. The old pair (1995) will get some special material ironed on at the back of the large tear and rejuvenate them for gardening or heavy fish filleting& cooking engineering.

      I am getting ready for taking the sardines to the cinema, Carolyn.

      It reminds me of a school friend who managed to tape a sardine underneath the teacher desk at high-school. It was such a delightful prank even better than using blowpipes to shoot wet paper props onto the classroom ceiling. As the paper props dried they would fall down much to the delight of the students.
      Hugs to you too, Carolyn.

      Liked by 2 people

      • doesitevenmatter3 Says:

        Ha! on the sardines! 😀

        Yes, as a teacher I actually loved the mischievous students best…and they were usually boys. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • gerard oosterman Says:

        I came close to being banned from high school in The Hague. I had taken white mice to school and released them onto the floor. Mice breed very fast. The white mice family at our home soon became so numerous I thought of taking some to school.
        The headmaster made me write 1000 times ‘I must not let loose white mice in the schoollroom’.

        Liked by 1 person

      • doesitevenmatter3 Says:

        HA! on the mice! 😀
        Hey, How are you doing this week?
        How is Helvi?
        How is Milo?
        HUGS!!! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • gerard oosterman Says:

        We are doing fine and united in our quest to make the joint as good as possible. How are you going? I went to see the quack and promptly got a booking for a cardiologist. I have an enlarged heart!
        Some say, to stay away from medical issues. Just stick to aspirins and Tiger Balm.
        Milo knows!
        Hugs from all of us. Stay well, Carolyn.

        Like

  5. shoreacres Says:

    I’m going to start by saying I didn’t have a clue what moleskins might be, and I imagined every sort of thing before I finally resorted to a search and learned that they can be human clothing, as well! Now, I’m just going to try leaving this, and if it works, I’ll be back with the rest of my comment….

    Liked by 1 person

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      It worked very well,Linda. Your previous comment on the Clivia post was found in the spam department. Just as well you drew attention to that. I am constantly amazed how things can go astray or wrong in the world of the internet. I keep getting phone calls from people that want their tractors repaired. My landline number used to belong to tractor specialist.

      Spam also is a kind of cooked tinned meat that was hugely popular in Australia during the fifties or even before. During the second world-war it was eaten all over the world. We did not have it in Holland.
      For most Europeans it was inedible.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. shoreacres Says:

    Hurrah! what a trial this brave new techie world can be. I still am having most comments flee into the void, but at least we have things straightened out here.

    My aunt (93 now) is suddenly having terrible memory problems, and it’s causing her no end of distress. Whether it’s “just” memory loss or something more, she isn’t sure, but it frustrates her no end to not be able to remember the date, or the names of relatives, or why she just walked into the living room. She called me this week to ask if I knew why she wanted to call me. I offered a few suggestions, but we never could find the right one, so we decided not to worry about it.

    She’s become hard of hearing, too, and her kids want her to get hearing aids, but, as she says, “There’s not that much I want to listen to, anyway.” She misses bird song, but is able to hear conversation and has headphones for the tv, so she still navigates pretty well.
    The loss of any sense is a trial at best and a real handicap at worst, but at least today we have some ways (like closed captioning) to help make up for the losses.

    Liked by 1 person

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      Yes, Linda. I was so relieved to find your lost post locked in the spam department. It was a great moment when after un-spamming it, your post appeared like magic.

      Both Helvi and I try and keep out memory well oiled but as the years go buy our memory storage gets overloaded. Only yesterday I had lost the name of a favourite plant; the helleborus . We help each other with cross-words. My mother lived till almost 96 and crosswords was her favourite hobby.

      I can still hear some bird songs, especially when Helvi points it out.

      Like

  7. janesmudgeegarden Says:

    Gerard, your posts are always so entertaining and often amusing, I feel you are dealing with advancing age with grace and aplomb.

    Liked by 1 person

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      Thank you Jane. Advancing years do come about. One might as well make the most of it. Last week while feeding the chickens next door, I fell flat on my face. I stumbled. Is this a new stage of getting older? I had no harm or broken anything, did not even hurt.

      Like

      • janesmudgeegarden Says:

        I also went downlike a felled tree last week after tripping on the edge of someone’s drive while taking a walk! I was very annoyed that I didn’t even get a bruise to show for it!

        Liked by 1 person

  8. Curt Mekemson Says:

    Up until now, Gerard, I always assumed that moleskin was something you used to prevent blisters. The adhesive sticks to your feet, forever.
    My hearing isn’t what it once was, either! –Curt

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Big M Says:

    Mrs M dragged me into RM Williams the other day. Black boots, socks plus leather care products. The same comment. ” I think they’ll see you out!”

    Liked by 1 person

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      ‘Seeing you out,’ is rather comforting. With men, buying things is not as important and very few actually enjoy shopping. In shopping centres and supermarkets it is not unusual to see men sitting in the car waiting for the partners to finish shopping.

      Here in Bowral on many a Saturday one sees women, with eyes all flushed and red cheeks, loaded with large bags emblazed with fashion names, running about. It is clear they are on a shopping high.

      Like

  10. freefall852 Says:

    Ah..shopping.. :
    Down the Aisles
    Your shopping correspondent’s report.

    On a different theme today, not withstanding the news from the packaged cake mix shelf that “The Little Brownie Co.” has nudged “Messy Jessie” off the main shelf over to the ancillary shelf ..sad, really, to see that delightful young cook “remainded”..though I do notice that “White Wings” has maintained complete domination of the shelf space!..Isn’t it always the same : Corporations rule!

    But that’s not what I wanted to report today from the shopping. The most amazing thing happened..You know how difficult those unwieldy shopping trolleys can be with a full load?..well, I came swishing around the corner of aisle 7, cut close to the rack of “Sienna chopped tomatoes” and lined myself up on “the right line”(as they say in the motorcycle racing game) to cut into the rice rack for a quick pick-up of “Doongari Clever Rice”…and there, right in front was another fully laden trolley navigated by this slip of a girl !..evasive action was applied by both of us to avoid a collision..and I do not think I need to describe the consequences of such a disaster of two fully laden shopping-trolleys colliding at full-pitch…ISIS. would have claimed responsibility for the resulting mayhem!

    But just as it seemed inevitable, the strangest thing happened ; We both put in place, with synchronistic timing our “ collision prevention plan”..With my left hand in a firm grip on the trolley handle, and my right on the basket corner of the trolley, I pulled off the most amazing 90 deg. Spin around..and the lady did EXACTLY the same maneuver in opposition!…both trolleys performing the perfect pas de deux whilst the owners exchanged places and then continuing the movement, like two rock’n’rollers performing a jitterbug routine, we spun and double switched back so avoiding an earthquake of a collision and continued on our way with a passing high-five as salute.

    An amazing maneuver that has to go down as an essential in the “Shopping-trolley collision prevention handbook”…But in my book , I will always refer to it as : “The dance of the seventh aisles”.

    Until next time, this is your shopping correspondent singing off.

    Liked by 1 person

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      Shopping and trolleys are a modern invention. Shopping trolley rage is getting more acceptable. Some of the larger supermarkets now employ trolley counsellors. They try and sooth the shopper into a more calmer mind whereby the trolleys and shoppers become friends again.
      The worst time is the pre- Christmas shopping time. A nervous atmosphere of rampant trolley rage. Elderly especially are at risk and ambulances are kept busy. The dairy sections are the most dangerous. You can imagine all that slippery butter, yoghurt and other dairy products being thrown about between enraged consumers. Mothers are seen getting stuck into their toddlers for wanting those squeeze tubes of sugar loaded fruity blasts.

      Be prepared! It is a nightmare.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. freefall852 Says:

    While not wanting to tangent away from the header subject on to shopping trolleys and their “weaponisation”, I would still like to relate a most tragic moment that happened to a relative of mine some years ago concerning a shopping trolley, that has affected him up till this day…:

    He had just bought himself his first brand spanking new car…a Holden Kingswood..bright lime-green..he was a gregarious chap..and being super cautious to not have it scratched or knocked whilst parked up at the local mega-market, he made it a point to park the car way-away in the bottom corner of the car-park.

    This one day, he decided to have an expresso coffee before shopping…Sitting there in the cafe at the big window, he could see his bright lime-green Kingswood parked in splendid isolation at the bottom of the car-park..he sipped his coffee whist admiring his beautiful toy…when movement at the upper end of the park caught his eye…

    You know..Lady Fate has a cruel streak in her…in that she will first draw your attention to her intent to do you harm in a most un-nerving way and with awful premonition, she will taunt you with an unease of the certainty of disaster and yet allow you no chance of stopping it…like watching a train-wreck in slow motion, she will gleefully torture you with a cruel certainty of inevitability.

    My relative watched a young, frustrated mother wrestling with baby on hip, boot open, loading bags of shopping into her car whilst obviously attending the wrestling infant..slamming the boot-lid down and then angrily shoving the shopping trolley away without care or concern…My relative watched with both mesmerising curiosity and horror as the trolley performed a slow, predictable, parabolic curve of most pure mathematical precision, and , guided by the tyrannical hand of cruel Fate, gathered speed down the gentle slope and even with trolley-wheels wobbling alarmingly, made a bee-line to a bright lime-green Kingswood..set there now looking as big as a barn-door just waiting for a projectile….and with all the emotional tempest of a Heathcliff and Catherine rushing toward each other’s arms on Wuthering Heights..they did indeed find each other…
    We can draw the curtain of sympathy down over my relative’s facial expression at that moment…sufficient to say that from that day forward he ceased to contribute to ANY charitable religious collections…concluding, quite correctly, that there is no good God!

    Like

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