The Tail-end of a Horse

IMG_0050horse head

I have never taken to week-ends. They are mainly boring. I don’t understand why week-ends can’t be normal days and a continuation of the week.  Years ago, out of sheer ennui, people went for Sunday drives. Now, many go to look at sport or go to rave parties. Isn’t amazing that the voluntary pill testing has come up with so many people taking pills. It seems that even going to music needs to be accompanied by taking medical enhancement products. Do people take pills to go to an opera or to church? I watched footage of a musical event down the coast. Many young people were jigging about. They were throwing their arms, lolling their eyes. Was that an expression of the musical quality of the event? Are those multi coloured pills doing that?

Before I go any further. Have a look at this 104 year old man. He is on his way to the last event of life in Switzerland. I found it very moving.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-05-05/david-goodall-trip-to-switzerland-for-voluntary-euthanasia/9716354

Apart from all that, the clay-horse is still fascinating us. I would appreciate if people know more about this horse. Let us know! Herewith a few more pictures as well. We now feel that the horse has Chinese origins. The details are very fine and all this in clay. Amazing.

IMG_0052 a horse, a horse

Helvi made a new tail. Is it perhaps a bit too yellow? In time this might fade. Time does that well. His ears are still in the making. I fashioned them from clay and they are now drying before I will try and fire them in the outside oven. I’ll keep you informed. At least the week-end has now started. And soon it will be Monday.

A normal day.

IMG_0055the horse's tail

 

 

 

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13 Responses to “The Tail-end of a Horse”

  1. Andrew Says:

    Once we retire days lose their significance. We can live as we choose. Sunday was historically a day of rest and for people to go to church. That is largely a thing of the past. The working week is an artificial construct that we ignore as far as we can. The horse looks wonderful. A rare Chinese antique perhaps?

    Liked by 3 people

  2. doesitevenmatter3 Says:

    I wept all the way through the article about Dr. David Goodall. I’m so glad he is getting to end his life his way. What an amazing life and amazing man!

    I had an uncle who lived to 107. My mom lived to almost-98. They were both healthy until their early 90’s and then their bodies just began to wear out. Hearing, seeing, tasting, chewing, walking, etc. And the only thing the doctors would say to them is, “The human body wasn’t meant to live this long. Nothing we can do to help you.” 😦

    OH! Helvi created Horse such a beautiful, bright, cheery new tail! 🙂 I can’t wait to see his new ears! 🙂 I hope you can find out more about Horse’s history.
    HUGS!!! 🙂

    Liked by 4 people

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      Yes, David Goodall made his last contribution to mankind. The freedom to end life when all has been done and all has been contributed with nothing more to give.
      I too shed a tear, more out of admiration than sadness. Farewell David.
      As for the horse; my daughter looked up images of terracotta horses from the Tang dynasty. Here are some.


      Hugs to you too.

      Liked by 2 people

      • doesitevenmatter3 Says:

        Yes, me, too…and I cried tears of joy that he gets to end things his way.

        Oh! Thank you for the Horse link! I’ll check it out!

        HUGS!!! for you and Helvi!
        PATS!!! for Milo! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • gerard oosterman Says:

        It would be extraordinary if the horse was an antique or had anything to do with the Tang dynasty. What is so wonderful is the making of it in terracotta. The size alone would indicate the maker would have to be very skilled in making it.
        Just look at the details!
        Hugs too you.

        Liked by 2 people

  3. shoreacres Says:

    Now that I have a closer look at your steed, I’m even more struck by its similarity to some Mexican terra cotta pieces I have. I’m sure it isn’t Mexican — it’s just that the similarities seem more prominent in these views.

    I don’t think a bit about any distinction between weekend and weekday. On reflection, I suspect that’s because my work has been weather dependent for nearly 30 years. If it rains, I don’t work. If the weather allows, I do. Simple as that. Of course, the joke among varnishers is that the only thing better than rain on a weekend is rain on a holiday weekend. Our perspective is a little quirky.

    Liked by 1 person

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      I suppose the horse in any country would look a horse. I like your use of the word steed. This horse is the size of a large dog which I think makes it a remarkable work of artisanship if not art.

      Yes, I understand your relationship with the weekdays relating to work and the weather, Linda. I therefore hope you do get enough rain. We are getting into a drought and farmers are worried. The paddocks are brown and cows listlessly scraping the dust, waiting for their feed.

      Like

      • shoreacres Says:

        I forgot to tell you that a friend has a miniature horse not much bigger than this one. Its name is Abbey, and she got it from a group of nuns who were famous for raising the little horses. They got to the point where age was taking its toll, and they weren’t able to care for the horses, so they put them for sale and Pam got one. I should take a photo the next time I’m out there. Abbey’s almost as pretty as your new horse!

        Liked by 1 person

      • gerard oosterman Says:

        I would really love to see a picture of Abbey, Linda. We had Shetland ponies while living in Holland. I have finished making the tail for my horse. I did it in between the radiation trips and household duties. I have to now work on fastening it to the main body of my horse.
        Of course, the ears will be next. It keeps me off the street.

        Like

  4. Julia Lund Says:

    A fine tail.

    Like

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