Elder abuse.

A few days ago I noticed an ABC news item that struck me as relevant. It dealt with the growing queues of elderly people missing out on levels of subsidised in-home care. Often people need respite and care either for themselves or another person such as a partner or family members. A segment on TV news dealt with same issue.

Footage was shown of an elderly woman hoisting her severely affected Alzheimer  and Parkinson husband up in a sling from one side of the house to the other. A steel beam was bolted onto the ceiling and an electric block and tackle system was used to move her husband about the house. Another case was how a woman needed to be helped from her bed into the electric chair in which she could perform most house-hold duties. It is the relentless care day in day out that many need respite from. But, as always the money for those essential services is lacking. Yet we talk about tax cuts!

The article is here: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-02-03/govt-scrambles-amid-growing-queue-for-home-care-packages/9387692

Here is a sample of the article; “The latest figures reveal there are now 101,508 people in the queue for appropriate home-care packages.More than 60,000 have no package at all, and 40,000 have a package at a lower level than what they need”.

And then this morning on the TV, ( where else)? The Prime Minister being interviewed, waxing lyrically how tax cuts to corporate Australia was going to help employment and profits. He followed this up with while looking up,   prophesying by seemingly divine inspiration, that this would then guarantee increased wages to the workers. Surely he must have felt thickening of his insincerity.

I mean, look at America. Do the wages there go in tandem with corporate profits? In Australia profits in businesses between 2016/17 went up 20%, yet wages a mere 1%. The trickle down effect is a huge joke.

 

It seems a logical conclusion, that if countries keep giving tax cuts, it eventually means no tax will be raised at all. Pity for those that are waiting for home-care packages.

If you want to take an example to follow. Look at Northern Europe ,especially the Scandinavian countries were taxes are very high, but so are  welfare levels. AND, their economies are booming. Our Prime Mister, Mr Turnbull, should try and raise revenue. A sugar tax alone would bring in hundreds of millions a year and save billions on health care. Our GST could be raised on a level with overseas countries. Why does the government never mention raising revenue and income?.

And right on the heels of the above article, another one popped up this morning about elder abuse which now seem more often than not to come from within the family.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-02-04/the-silent-epidemic-of-elder-abuse-in-our-suburbs/9383812

I know if I get ripped off by own family or need to be moved around in a sling suspended from a steel beam, totally gaga, I will, before that arrives, have the sanity and means to get-out-of-here-quick smart.

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28 Responses to “Elder abuse.”

  1. lifecameos Says:

    It is scary. In our family the next generation mostly had their children in their thirties, or even forties. The generation entering their seventies have unexpectedly been hit by genetic time bombs.

    Liked by 3 people

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      Yes, I know. Babies are born to parents not much older than the babies. Perhaps the boredom of it all makes them seek each other out and breed.

      The answer though is education and with the private versus public schools, that battle is also not fought on equal grounds.

      Even so, every now and then a leader pops up like a shiny little diamond and makes for change.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. berlioz1935 Says:

    When I heard our PM this morning I felt il from the anger he produced in me. I switched him off after a couple of sentences. This man has no shame. The figures you quote prove that the “trickle down” has not worked and never will. All the money they get goes straight to profit. He explained the economic mantra that investment is good, but he did not explain why the companies would invest in an economy with shrinking demand. Reaganomics was a lie.

    There will never be enough money for the needy. And now the idiot wants to spend 3.2 billion to create a weapons industry.

    Liked by 4 people

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      Our PM Turnbull has lost it some time ago. You can read it in his face. He just likes to get votes and admiration.

      I wonder if his wife Lucy eggs him on to be a more of a leader and makes him practice a more staunch like look with his chin jutting up in front of the mirror?

      And now we are going to sell guns and cannons!

      Liked by 1 person

      • berlioz1935 Says:

        With those new guns and cannons we will be spreading more misery. I think they can those weapons of mass destruction to the Saudis who are doing a wonderful “wonderful” job in the Jemen.

        Like

      • gerard oosterman Says:

        We will be competing with the US who are selling the weapons to the Saudis.
        Of course, Myanmar is another lucrative market for our weapons to annihilate the refugees fleeing into Bangla Dash.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. leggypeggy Says:

    Excellent post with countless truths.

    Liked by 1 person

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      We are happy with the community nurse coming along. I remember a nurse would visit my mum each time she had a baby and she had six of them. Helvi tells me the same was happening in Finland and her mum had nine.

      It now seems that the old and frail often might need care to keep going. It is going to be expensive but not as expensive as giving tax cuts to the Corporations. Billions are being washed clean overseas,

      Watch ABC 4 Corners tonight!
      We will all be lucky to get out alive.

      Liked by 1 person

    • leggypeggy Says:

      I’ll be watching 4Corners. As an aside, we had Poor John’s Aunt Esther with us for eight years—from the time she was 89 until 97 when she went in to demented aged care. She should have gone in much earlier, but we were very lucky to have a community worker come for a brief time on five mornings a week.

      Like

      • gerard oosterman Says:

        The ideal would have to be families looking after each other as in the days before aged pensions and restless moving about.
        Most of us now live apart and spread out everywhere. Years ago we used to have foreign students living with us and it worked very well. They were interesting times and much fun.

        Like

  4. Master of Something Yet Says:

    Corporate tax cuts make my blood boil. I mean, what do they need tax cuts for when most of them pay little to no tax in the first place? And if I had a time machine, I’d go back and find the person who came up with ‘trickle down economics’ and suggest they find a different vocation. Or punch them the nose.

    I will never, ever understand why people see tax as such a bogey man when it is what can mean the difference between a civil society and an imploding one. Look to the USA, indeed. Basket case.

    I used to joke to the kids if Abbott was elected, we’d move to Finland. If I had the wearwithal to handle the language barrier, I’d still do that. I’d rather pay more tax and know that every citizen has the chance to live well than watch 8 more billionaires be created in Australia while the average wage stagnates.

    Sorry about the rant. As a Libran, this is a sore spot. I like life to be fair.

    How’s Helvi?

    Liked by 2 people

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      Many large corporation don’t pay tax at all. They shift money overseas and employ financial wizards/vultures to make the books complicated and out of bounds.

      Their yachts bobbing up and down the Mediterranean after having flown in on their corporate jets, belching richness’s while swallowing Rennies and caviar.

      The poor crawling over gigantic rubbish tips happy to find a cabbage leaf.
      Helvi is doing fine, writing again on political issues attacking and questioning our PM and cohorts.

      Like

  5. auntyuta Says:

    “Trickle down effect”. Yes, for sure nothing but a joke. Are there still any people that do believe in it? Why does the Prime Minister talk that way? How can you trust someone who keeps repeating these things that are obviously not true. Do people care whether they are being told the truth or whether they are being lied to?

    Liked by 1 person

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      The position of his lies will express themselves at the next election. Surely, after so many negative polls he will get the boot-up?

      I only hope that people will finally also get rid of the Monarchy. How can we keep our heads up and not snicker when our head of state is a foreign queen.

      Yet, anyone with just a smidgeon of English nationality cannot be in Parliament. How Monty Python is that?

      Liked by 1 person

  6. stuartbramhall Says:

    This is pure inefficiency. From a public health perspective, it’s always been more economical to provide in-home care than institutional care – failure to provide in-home care also drives up the cost of emergency care and end-of-life care (where most of our health care dollars get spent).

    Liked by 2 people

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      Yes, it makes good economic sense to help people stay in their homes. However, good economic sense is lacking. The Government’s logic seems to think that giving the money meant for healthcare to the Corporations is better.
      They are in supreme health and getting fatter.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. hilarycustancegreen Says:

    Chilling and so unnecessary. Here in the UK the majority of people would be willing to part with £1 a week if it went to the NHS we love so much. Yet the government daren’t raise taxes, because they fear it s political suicide. Grr!

    Liked by 4 people

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      Here the local Government is in cahoots with the federal boys. A huge sporting stadium is planned and the old Olympic stadium to be demolished. The old stadium is perfect and totally suitable for ball running ,jumping about, cricket batting or other exhausting sports.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. kaytisweetlandrasmussen83 Says:

    An article today describes a number of elder “help” items from technology. Taking into account that many (most) aged people have diminished sight, it leaves you back at square one wondering how to use them. I agree that a quick snuggle into a pillow would be better than being slung around the house. A year or so ago when I spent a week in a nursing facility, a 400# plus woman was moved around in a large sling. I can’t think of anything much more humiliating.

    Liked by 2 people

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      Yes, I remember getting pairs of spectacles for free in Holland as a school boy. However they were known as ‘health benefits’ glasses and as a boy I felt to be a bit poor.

      We do get government hearing aids for the over 65.

      In hospitals cranes have been installed to heave very large patients about.

      I noticed that obese patients are in large numbers in hospitals. The Coke machines have been removed from our hospital but they are now placed outside but still near the entrance.
      Coca Cola Amatil are the ones really in Government.

      I am waiting for the day a butter-milk dispenser will be placed in hospitals, Kayti.

      Liked by 2 people

  9. Julia Lund Says:

    Adult social care has been cut to the bone in the UK. I always think a test of our societies is to look at how we treat the most vulnerable …

    Liked by 3 people

  10. petspeopleandlife Says:

    Trickle down effect? Only the politicians and the very rich believe in this lal-la land fable. Ignorant folks that voted for Turning Bull and Twittler still believe in the compounded lies. What does it take to wise up the non-believers? I suppose inflation or deflation or utter poverty will wise up folks and jobs that do not come forth as promised. It is all a joke.

    Yes there are millions of folks that could benefit from elder care in the home and yet it is very difficult to get the government to pay for continuous care. The government would rather the money go to poorly functioning nursing homes because they are all in it together scamming the poor and the innocent.

    Like

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      The only trickle down effects are from Milo lifting his leg when we walk him.
      Some of the larger corporations are now giving some extra money to their workers but it is a lot less than the profits they are making. Most of the extra money stays with the rich.
      Finland is trying a dry run on paying everyone a standard wage. It might well work more efficient than the complicated and unjust way of sharing wealth around at the moment.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. doesitevenmatter3 Says:

    Such an important post, Gerard. Well expressed.

    How the elderly, ill, and homeless are treated (not treated) is sad and scary.
    It says a lot about humanity. Sadly, humanity is not humane enough. 😦

    (((HUGS)))

    Like

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      It is for the young to harness the ideas of bringing about a more and better way of distributing wealth. The unemployed and pensioners are missing out badly on having a ‘living income’. As a society we care for everyone. It should not just be left to the luck (or non luck) of our birth.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Andrea T Says:

    Abuse of the elderly reflects the beliefs in the USA. In our society… we are throw away people… youth and beauty are Gods.

    Like

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