It came to $41.20 without any sugar

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Grapes, strawberries and figs.

The $41.20 was the total of our shopping adventure this morning. The day started early. With the change in day-light saving we seem to get up earlier instead of sleeping longer. That sleeping-in, so desired when young, evades us now. I am always glad the night is over. Unless we have to get out shopping and walking, we generally muck about till midday in our pyjamas. Now that winter is knocking, we might consider not even moving out of them at all. We shall see!

We are still reeling somewhat from a range of TV programs whereby eating sugar has been taken under the loupe. I hope millions have watched those TV programs and the dire consequences resulting from eating sugar. It is not just obvious sugar, no it is the hidden sugar in our foods. Most breakfast cereals, sauces, micro-wave foods and almost all processed foods have  lots of sugar.  I thought that a fruit yoghurt was a fairly safe food to ingest. Wrong! That too has ladles of sugar. So have all fruit drinks. Of course, a Coke drink is pure poison. If cigarettes are addictive, the experts reckon so is sugar. The present world epidemic of obesity is all sugar related. Yet,  apart from some brave souls exposing the evils of sugar, our government is eerily quiet. “A personal choice,” they might sometimes whisper behind closed doors.

We have never been fond of sweets and apart from one spoon of sugar in coffee we never take the stuff in anything else. We cook without shop-bought sauces. I suppose those lovely Italian tinned tomatoes have some sugar, as has most bread and pasta. We never drink lemonade or soft drinks, and reckon water is as good a drink as any. But…what about wine? I thought that the sugars in grapes convert into alcohol. Is that so? I hope so. I would not like to give up my love of the afternoon ritual sitting in the garden talking with Helvi while sipping wine.

Milo knows the ritual and we bring his cushion out. A creature of habit. He sees me filling a glass with Shiraz and he bolts towards the back-yard sliding doors. He loves us doing that. So, I do hope that there isn’t too much sugar in wine, even if just for Milo’s sake.

It is amazing that most of our modern dietary habits have been installed by the large Multi Corporations. I remember the large Coca Cola truck rolling into our primary schools in Holland giving all children a free Coca Cola. This was during the mid nineteen- fifties. It was the beginning of the end. We seem powerless against the intrusion into our lives by those large businesses that profit from spreading premature deaths to millions all over the world. Deaths that can easily be avoided by not eating so much sugar.  The health costs eventually will force government to act and stand up to the likes of MacDonald, KFC, Cadbury and all those other perfidious multi nationals. I noticed that some school kids during sport wear caps with the McDonald logo on it. How is that possible?  Where are the protesting parents?

In those programs the large corporations were asked about their responsibility in all that obesity. They avoided it by denying the evils of sugar. The same tactics used by cigarette companies.

But getting back to our shopping bill. The $41.20 included;  a man’s flannel pyjamas (XL), a bottle of Precious Earth Shiraz,  a four pack of salmon cutlets, a bar of Dove soap, a bunch of broccolini, three avocadoes, Cherri tomatoes, a tin of Italian tomatoes and four bananas. There might have been another item but I threw away the receipt.

 

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27 Responses to “It came to $41.20 without any sugar”

  1. adal2com청주건마 Says:

    […] via It came to $41.20 without any sugar — Oosterman Treats Blog […]

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Yvonne Says:

    I just adored the vision of Milo knowing what the glass of shiraz signals, lovely family time together!

    I’m listening to the ABC news and hated to hear about the looting in Lismore. Those criminals are the scum of the earth!

    Happy Daylight Savings Time, Italy went back to Standard Time a week or so ago.

    How much a bananas this week?

    Liked by 2 people

    • Big M Says:

      Still about three Dollars/ kg, but will triple in a few weeks. We have just done our shopping. We eat at Crinitis,,reminisce about Italy, then come back down ro earth to shop. Much more than forty one dollars!

      Liked by 2 people

      • Yvonne Says:

        Hi, Sister M (assuming I’ve got all the characters at the pub sorted). I bought a pair of pj’s today for 9 euro. You can do the exchange rate between nursing type duties. Cheers.

        Liked by 2 people

      • Big M Says:

        Yes Sister Y, nine Euros sounds pretty good. We only spent a month in Italy but loved the little trattorias, where we ate and drank well for a few Euros.

        Hope you are still enjoying the European adventure.

        Liked by 2 people

      • gerard oosterman Says:

        Bananas are $ 1.90 at Aldi’s. The pyjamas were $12.-. I am donning them now as I write.
        The PM is going around the country-side washing mud off flooded shop walls , and talking about how ‘gut wrenching’ it all is.
        So much water around, I feel like a row-boat.

        It must be so nice in Napoli now.

        Liked by 3 people

      • gerard oosterman Says:

        Glad you enjoyed all the trattorias Big M.

        The pyjamas are dark blue made in China. I suppose Chinese girls would have handled them last. Sewing the hem, gentle nimble fingers manoeuvring the elastic around the waste. I bought a large size and now need to put the waist almost under the arm-pits.
        It makes one think how China is now quickly becoming the largest economy in the world.
        I do hope they will take care not to allow its citizens becoming enslaved to sugar.
        I would rather wear a Chinese made pyjama than a Big Mac around my waste.

        Liked by 2 people

  3. Christine Says:

    Okay, I’m owning up . . . to just loving a Big Mac every now and then.
    I grew up with the only takeaway – fish’n’chips on Friday nights; as children, we never ate out at restaurants. And there was no soft drink in our house. Sweets on Friday nights only.
    We all stayed slim.

    I’m trying to work out why I love a Big Mac.

    Liked by 3 people

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      Yes, the allure of a Big Mac is so strong.

      I grew up with scarce potato peeling soup, gruel and lumpy porridge. It did me a lot of good. I would not be the curmudgeon if it wasn’t for those early childhood experiences, Christine.

      I remember my first Coca Cola. I drank it over an entire day. At the end, it had got warm and lost its sparkle. Even so, I loved it.

      We never had soft drinks and at birthdays my mum made a drink the night before from cordial all mixed with water. She would cover it with a tea towel. In my heightened sense of excitement and joy, I allowed myself a peak under the tea-towel to glimpse this lovely orange coloured treat yet to come.

      Shop keepers in Holland used to give lollies to kiddies.
      Today, giving lollies to kids would risk a police wagon coming screaming around the corner.

      Like

  4. petspeopleandlife Says:

    Gerard that was a light grocery list but you purchased essential items. You know, lounging around in pajamas is an exercise in freedom and I also stay in my pjs well past noon on the week-ends.I adore flannel. So warm and cozy.

    The photo of the fruit is beautiful in the dim light. I like it very much. I adore figs and have about 5 trees. I planted extra because the squirrels and birds get more than half.

    I grocery shop once per week and it is over $100 each time and that is just for one person. The soy I drink is the expensive item. I buy only chicken tenders and the rest is fresh fruit and vegetables and essential household items. It’s a shame but one can not escape the grocery store.

    Liked by 2 people

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      Yes, Ivonne. A small list. We go shopping almost daily. I like this daily chore as I do washing up. That’s why we always have fresh stuff. We try and have at least four vegetables.

      Both of us are not sweet toothed and rarely eat a sweet. We have soft drinks stored in the cupboard when the grand-kids come over. They too are not all that keen on sweets either. I have corrupted them with garlic prawns or chicken curries.

      Sometimes, I make pancakes from butter milk which they love with golden syrup and jam..

      Liked by 1 person

      • petspeopleandlife Says:

        Gerard, you are eating wisely and it is very good for your health. It’s good that no one has a sweet tooth. Sugar is bad.

        Liked by 1 person

      • gerard oosterman Says:

        Yes, sugar addiction is bad. I sometimes see a shopper opening a Coke before they have even paid for it. The addiction so strong with the urgency to get a sugar hit getting the better of them. They are in panic mode.
        Afterwards, a huge burb and sigh of relief. They smile apologetically at the cashier. We all have to have patience and understanding for sugar addicts.
        I sometimes carry a carrot and offer it to an obvious sugar addict loitering around the soft-drink division at Aldi’s.

        Like

  5. shoreacres Says:

    You’ll never catch me demonizing sugar. Of course, I grew up in a time and place where it played a supporting role: candy in a Christmas stocking, pie for Sunday dinner, and so on. Even today, I don’t consume soft drinks, fast food, or frozen dinners — with one exception. For whatever reason, a road trip calls for a diet Coke or two, and they’re always a delight.

    Besides, it’s common down here for diner waitresses, grocery store clerks, and bar maids to call everyone in sight “Sugar.” We wouldn’t want to turn that into a negative!

    Liked by 1 person

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      I can’t say I need a Coke but do like a herring sometimes. I have a graving for salami or Knack-wurst. I laughed at your “sugar” greeting in your neck of the woods.

      On arrival in Australia in 1956, we sauntered around our first Australian Port-of-call in Fremantle. My dad wanted to buy us a soft drink. It was in January and boiling hot. As he entered a local shop he was asked; ‘What do you want darl?” He thought she was making a pass at him. It was a common way of greeting someone by calling them “Darls.”

      Like

  6. Curt Mekemson Says:

    What a sweet post, Gerard. And, yes, wine has its share of calories. Milo has it right, though. Dogs know the good and bad times. A trip outside with Dad: good times! A trip to the vet: bad times! 🙂 –Curt

    Liked by 1 person

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      Oh, we have to take Milo to the vet and he is traumatised for days afterwards. He is no hero and always scratches his feet on the linoleum towards the exit door. Other dogs look at him with contempt.
      Thanks Curt. ( from Milo)

      Like

      • Curt Mekemson Says:

        Please relay to Milo that Socrates was in complete agreement with him. He would know we were going to the vet within several blocks and go into a deep funk. He felt the same way about dog kennels. –Curt

        Like

  7. stuartbramhall Says:

    Interesting you comparing the behavior of the sugar lobby to the tobacco lobby. Tobacco manufacturers add sugar to cigarettes to make them more addictive.

    Liked by 2 people

  8. gerard oosterman Says:

    The cigarette companies now target third world countries. Indonesia the smoking is horrendous. Small children have become addicted and cigarettes are cheap. In tourist areas some cafes offer smoke free zones. I suspect Bali draws in tourists addicted to tobacco from around the world. They can smoke to their heart’s content.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. hilarycustancegreen Says:

    I hope the relaxation and Milo’s faith act as the healthy counterpart to the sugars in the wine http://winefolly.com/review/sugar-in-wine-chart/.

    Liked by 1 person

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      That link was very informative, Hilary. The dryer the wine the less sugar. Cheap wine is likely to have added sugar. Sugar in wine seems difficult to taste even by experts.

      If in doubt; drink less! That sounds a bit grim and probably comes from a teetotaller.

      Like

  10. kaytisweetlandrasmussen83 Says:

    How can anything so delicious be bad? It is clearly the best part of a meal, it gives you a boost when you need a friend, it is, as you point out, in all the processed foods. Why would they put it in if it was bad? Then some smart alec points out the old obesity thing, the diabetis thing, the tooth rot thing, etc. Oh well, I guess you’re right—sugar is NOT our friend. What else? raw carrots? May as well go back to bed.

    Liked by 1 person

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      Yes, that’s right. Sugar does give a boost and looking around many are on very friendly terms with sugar.
      There was another program called ‘Insight’ on the telly last night. It was all about diabetes and how it can be reversed by a good diet. Lots of carrots seem to be the answer, Kayti. Forget about ‘low fat’ foods. Just another scam by the food merchants, as is brown bread.
      Roughage is what we need. Oh, save us!

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Mary P Says:

    . Sugar does give a boost and looking around many are on very friendly terms with sugar.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Site Title Says:

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