Your order; 1×10 ISBNs have been purchased.

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The autumn is almost mid-way and the shadows are getting longer. Long shadows are so much better than none. The summers close to the equator are often harshly baked and shadowless, something that tourists ought to be informed about when contemplating a trip to the tropics or semi tropical regions. The waving stalky palms don’t offer shade as an ageing nodding oak would in milder climes.

Both of us have been re-planting things at the front of our home together with spreading cow manure and hardwood mulch. It looks better already. One sometimes wonders if gardening is not a better occupation than getting a book off the ground. In the past books could be used as door-stops or even hurled around when locked in a frustrating temper or to emphasize an argument knowing full well, we were wrong.

With e-books on Kindle or Amazon, even that little benefit might be harder to achieve. I remember and wrote previous about using a public toilet in Paris, realising too late it was sans toilet paper. In desperation I used a couple of travel cheques, noting first down the numbers for a reclaim. What was I to do; use a sock or my cotton hanky?

It took a while to understand the complexities of getting something published and thought that a friendly edit with the occasional inclusions or deletions of a couple of commas here and there would be about the worst of it.

In any case, at least with the 10 ISBN’s in possession, I feel it is at least getting there. The next move will be to push it towards a self-publish e-format that can be done through the service of the ASA ( Australia Society of Authors) which will also then suitably format it. I’ll be so pleased to actually find the book ‘Almost There,’ after searching it on the internet. I might even consider buying a couple of copies to kick it along.😉

The published hard-print version by Austin Macauley is also still bubbling along even though, in case of a refusal or worse , the option of ‘print on demand’ by CreatSpace will be followed. The next book will be better, and having the benefit of hind-sight with better knowledge of Micro-soft Word 2013, it will be a cinch. At least a taller and larger shadow might be cast when asked; what is your occupation? ‘Oh, I am an author.’ This response has to be practised carefully and ought to be given without a slipping or sliding of dodgy eye movements. A nonchalant manner needs to be acquired, not an easy task.

In the previous picture painting days, the answer used to vary from house- painter to bank accountant, building contractor, renovator, share trader-dealer, art teacher, but rarely artist. Why was that so? I did answer ‘artist’ at the Dutch Government employment agency soon after our arrival back to Holland in 1973 with our three children. To my utter surprise a job was provided as an artist within a few days. It involved painting Dutch scenes on clock dials used in the manufacture of ‘antique’ Grandfather clocks. The following months I painted hundreds of those kind of scenes with windmills and lots of seagulls. The manager of this clock factory was very happy with them. For years I still look at shops selling those upright clocks but not once did I find an original Oosterman.

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36 Responses to “Your order; 1×10 ISBNs have been purchased.”

  1. Carrie Rubin Says:

    Will you be using one of your own Dutch scenes for the cover?

    Liked by 2 people

  2. lifecameos Says:

    Posting writing on a website is seeming to be more and more like the simplest option every day.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. pethan35 Says:

    I like, “Long shadows are so much better than none.” Isn’t there a Dutch fairy tale about the man without shadow?

    You are an author and that description will leave a shadow.

    Liked by 2 people

  4. shoreacres Says:

    What you say about the quality of tropical light is on target. During the summer, even here at 29N, the sun is high enough that the light changes, and becomes harsher. Mad dogs, Englishmen, and just about everyone not forced by circumstance to be out and about disappear until later in the afternoon.

    I laughed at the book-as-doorstop reference. I once had a one-volume Oxford English dictionary that served that purpose. Now, I’m puzzled as to where the thing went. I wish I had it again, and I don’t have any memory of giving it away, selling it, etc. It’s just gone. That’s life!

    Liked by 2 people

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      Perhaps the English dictionary went overboard. Did you ever read the story of Berkelouw’s historical book selling efforts back in Holland and now in Australia?

      Here it is;http://www.berkelouw.com.au/pages/about

      Liked by 1 person

      • auntyuta Says:

        We would like to go to Berkelouw’s Book Barn again, Gerard, but not this month. We would like to meet you and Helvi there some time in May. How about it?

        Like

      • gerard oosterman Says:

        May would be good. We are getting the grandchildren this week as well. Pancakes and garlic prawns is what they like, also racks of lamb marinated with lemon sauce, lots of garlic and rosemary. I will disengage the WiFi, wish me luck, Aunty.

        Liked by 1 person

      • auntyuta Says:

        Oh, I think you and Helvi are going to manage very well with your grandchildren’s visit. Have a lovely time with them!
        Peter sent you today an e-mail, suggesting a meeting shortly after Anzac day, that is in two weeks. Should this not suit you, I think it’s possible that we see you some time in May. Our daughter returns from China on the first of May. On the 3rd of June we’ll be off on our big trip to Berlin!

        Like

  5. elizabeth2560 Says:

    Moving from being a ‘writer’ to becoming an ‘author’ is a HUGE step. Congratulations!

    Liked by 2 people

  6. Curt Mekemson Says:

    One thing for sure, Gerard, becoming an author is darned hard work. It should be worn proudly! –Curt

    Liked by 1 person

  7. auntyuta Says:

    I do like shade at times, but bright sunshine is what I am mostly looking for. The Australian summer is most beautiful very early in the morning and later towards evening. In summer I try to avoid the sun around midday. But in the Australian winter the midday sun is truly precious.
    E-books have a bit of a place in my life right now. I like it, that I can set them on large print. However a lot of the e-books that I’ve been reading, I would also like to have in printed form. To leave through pages and find certain passages, I am not very good at doing this with an e-book.

    Liked by 2 people

    • auntyuta Says:

      I looked it up now, it is leaf through pages, isn’t it?

      Like

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      Of course, in the cold of winter it is nice to snatch sunshine and catch up on vitamin D.
      As for E books I have read a few and I like the large print. It also remembers where the last page was read. They are also a lot cheaper to buy. The disadvantage of E books is that one can’t leaf through them and read something at random.
      I like reading and open the book wherever it chooses to open.

      Liked by 2 people

      • auntyuta Says:

        That’s exactly what I like doing too, Gerard. I recently read an e-book about the life of a koori detective, who feels that he belongs to both world’s, the koori world, for his mother and stepfather were kooris, but he also belongs to white society, for his birth-father had been a Dutchman. In his career he often feels not totally accepted. He falls in love with a Swedish girl. They marry and he feels very much supported by her. Eventually he feels he becomes his own person. He then feels that he is able to be a link between both worlds and being appreciated in both worlds. I intend now to go through the whole e-book again to find the significant passages that I would like to take some notes of. The author is an Australian woman who writes about this koori man in a way that shows a great deal of understanding about the feelings and problems a person of mixed heritage and cultures might experience.

        Like

      • gerard oosterman Says:

        I wonder what the title and writer’s name of the book is, Uta? I don’t read as much as I should. So many things to divert attention away from reading.

        Like

      • auntyuta Says:

        You find it here:

        https://auntyuta.com/2016/04/12/utas-diary-tuesday-12th-april-2016/#respond

        Like

      • gerard oosterman Says:

        Thank you for pointing this out, Uta. I noticed the book is open for comment. As yet, no one seems to have commented on this book or gave a critique. Seeing you like the book very much, I wonder if you could be the first one to do so. Of course, only if you choose to do so.

        Like

  8. Julia Lund Says:

    It’s so exciting to read about your path to publication. And yes, why do we find it so hard to say, I’m a writer, or I’m and artist? Perhaps it’s because we want someone else to say it first, to validate it? Well, for what it’s worth, you Gerard Oosterman, are very definitely a writer, a story teller of great wit, sensitivity, poignancy and imagination.

    Liked by 4 people

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      Thank you Julia. Once the book takes on a concrete form I’ll be more likely to say that I am a writer. It used to be hugely popular and sophisticated to introduce one’s marital half as, ‘ meet my partner’ instead of my wife/husband.
      Of course now sometimes it is; meet my ex wife/husband. I doubt one could become an ex-writer except perhaps when long gone pushing daisies and forgotten.
      This from Christina Rossetti;

      When I am dead, my dearest,
      Sing no sad songs for me;
      Plant thou no roses at my head,
      Nor shady cypress tree:
      Be the green grass above me
      With showers and dewdrops wet:
      And if thou wilt, remember,
      And if thou wilt, forget.

      I shall not see the shadows,
      I shall not feel the rain;
      I shall not hear the nightingale
      Sing on as if in pain:
      And dreaming through the twilight
      That doth not rise nor set,
      Haply I may remember,
      And haply may forget.

      Liked by 2 people

  9. hilarycustancegreen Says:

    I did wonder whether a grandfather clock I saw on the Antiques Road Show was an original Oosterman. ISBNs – now that’s progress and at least you have a plan. This time next year you will either have a self-published book in your hands, or it will be in the pipeline with Austin Macauley. You’ll be relaxing into the marketing, promotion, launch party, selling at the local market stall fun.

    Liked by 2 people

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      Yes, Hilary. At the local markets and with own stall, perhaps combined with nicely marinated sate chicken on skewers, charcoal grilled.
      I am now supposed to register the ISBN with the national Library as well. Never a dull moment. I enjoy getting back in doing my short pieces.
      All the best with your launch of your latest book, ‘Surviving the Death Railway.’

      Like

  10. Patti Küche Says:

    You have done so well!!!

    Like

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