The Hypo or Hyper-Thyroiditis? That’s the question.

The Newspaper-seller.

The Newspaper-seller.

It does no harm to sometimes give in and go see the good doctor. I don’t really have an ‘own’ doctor, but visit a community health centre. It is surely a sign of good health not having a regular doctor. However, yesterday I received a letter to get my TFT test done. (Thyroid Function Test.)

Readers of this blog might remember the good days when living on the farm while driving back from shopping and arriving home, with Helvi opening the farm gate, she used to find me sound asleep by the time she got back into the car. This caused her alarm but not to me. It is very difficult to be alarmed when in a state of total non-alarm…

Some years before I was found to be asleep up-right at a lively party. People were jigging about with Carly Simon singing away. Some were also talking in great excitement. One party person,  caught me to listen attentively about how well his retirement fund was performing. He spoke about the benefits of compound interest, and how in twenty six years he would be able to retire on $674.50 a week. His superannuation fund was as flushed as he looked, really super.  He then tugged Helvi. ‘Your husband is not well, he is asleep,’ he said. ‘ ‘It happened while I was talking to him too.’ ‘ Can you believe it?’  ‘Oh yes,’ Helvi said. ‘He is not really suited for parties.’  ‘Don’t worry, it is not you, he falls asleep willy dilly at any time.’ The friend needed lots of reassuring. He wasn’t the most confident nor the best jigger. Perhaps, that was the attraction.

Farm gates or retirement funds do not by themselves induce sleep. However, it was felt I should get this investigated. I had my blood examined. The doctor noticed that every time the tests came back they showed up differently. ‘You have a dysfunctional thyroid,’ he enthused, finally getting rewarded for his persistence.  Since then I am taking a tablet that is suppose to balance my  thyroid and avoid sleeping upright or at farm gates.

Reading up about the Thyroid gland I wonder how much we control of what and who we are.  I am beginning to believe that we are more subject to our inherited genes than generally believed. I know that modern psychological trends are very much on the ‘unique’ individual and hammer home those terrific choices of who and what we want to be, and steer us into endless avenues of selections, opportunities and changes, and eventually becoming the real person of our choice. Book shops are chock-a-block and full of titles and promises of becoming whatever we want. The world is our oyster. Just buy the book and add some lemon with insight.

I am not too sure. Yes, we can chose to stay in bed or get up, eat a boiled four minute egg or a fried one, but what about those matters of joy or gloom? The tendencies for laughter, good cheer, bonhomie or their counterpart; the moroseness, heaviness and despair? Where do they come from and is it really a matter of pure choice.

To take the simple thyroid gland with hypo-thyroiditis and its effects, just cop this! “Patients are likely to have symptoms of lethargy, low energy levels, low heartbeat, anxiety.” The opposite of those with hyper-thyroiditis. “They tend to be more excitable, over-energetic, rapid heartbeat,  suffer nervousness and have trouble sleeping.”

I can still fall asleep no matter how exciting the event. I fell asleep during Wagner’s ‘The dance of the Valkyries!’ I have enjoyed that ability since my early teen years. I don’t know how often I went past my railway station after work or be jolted awake after my head came to rest on a passenger’s shoulder. I like it and feel on top of the world afterwards.

Next time I really should write about what it is that makes me wide awake and excited beyond endurance.

 

 

 

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36 Responses to “The Hypo or Hyper-Thyroiditis? That’s the question.”

  1. Therese Trouserzoff Says:

    Gez, my Dad used to sleep a lot on the train home from work. The old East Hills line does have that effect. I can attest to it as well.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. nonsmokingladybug Says:

    I think doctors are happy when they can put us on medication. I always think the severeness of the disease should determine if we have to swallow a daily pill, or if we just swallow a little bit of discomfort.

    Liked by 2 people

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      Yes, I don’t take it all the time either. You never really know what is best. I do know that over prescription is rife here. The medical profession form huge companies and get listed on the stock exchange.

      Like

  3. Mary Cathleen Clark Says:

    I don’t have to look any farther than my dad and son to agree with you on the influence of one’s genes on their health and personality. I mirror my dad health-wise and in looks, and that wonderful man lived to 94, his mind staying sharp until the very end. My son, who is 45, looks like me, and as he has matured, I see bits of my personality in him–not all of them good. lol And he seems to be following in my footsteps regarding any health issues.
    I wish I could fall asleep as easily as you, Gerard. It would be nice to sleep through some things.🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Carrie Rubin Says:

    “I can still fall asleep no matter how exciting the event.”—Good thing you aren’t a pilot…

    Liked by 1 person

  5. elizabeth2560 Says:

    I suffered fatigue and after much heartache and experimentation found out that it was the preservative in commercial bread. If I stay away from it, I am fine.

    Liked by 1 person

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      I keep trying different breads, and by and large, I go for the sour-dough version. Often I just have soup for breakfast.

      Liked by 2 people

      • shoreacres Says:

        When I was in grade school, I went through about a six-month period where I wanted only tomato soup and cold meat loaf for breakfast. My dad, in a fit of common sense, told my mother that I should have it. It was perfectly healthy, after all, and no trouble at all to produce. Make a meatloaf on the weekend, and all you have to do is slice some off. I’ve been known to do that more recently than you might think.

        Liked by 2 people

      • gerard oosterman Says:

        Ah, Meat-loaf is cool with me too. Back on a stay in Holland I lived with an (Dutch) uncle who was suffering with cancer in his shoulder. He blamed his ex-wife. I used to make him meatballs spiced with hot chilli which he felt would cure his cancer. He was also an ex chess master. He beat me each time. Even so, I kept making him the meat-balls till I left to go and live in Italy for a while. He died soon after. It turned out he lived with that hope of a cure till the last moment.

        Like

  6. berlioz1935 Says:

    It is a “Western disease” that we can’t accept ourselves as we are. There must be a cure for whatever is deemed to be wrong with us. But what we really suffer from they have no cure nor do they even know what is ailing us.

    Liked by 2 people

  7. kaytisweetlandrasmussen83 Says:

    For years I fell asleep each time we went for a drive or in the most exciting part of a movie. Today I briefly fall asleep during a TV movie regularly, but since there is little of interest anyway, I don’t miss much.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. kaytisweetlandrasmussen83 Says:

    While talking with a young pregnant friend I suddenly realized she was sound asleep. Doesn’t say much for my conversation.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Lottie Nevin Says:

    I wish that I could just fall to sleep. It’s the middle of the night and I’m wide awake!

    Liked by 1 person

  10. shoreacres Says:

    I’m really so blessed. When it’s time for bed, I go there, go to sleep, and don’t wake until either the cat, the sun, or my internal clock wakes me. I haven’t used an alarm clock for 20 years, I suppose.

    I do remember my best-ever falling asleep moment, though. I was sitting on a Pan-Am jet on the runway in NY, waiting to take off for Liberia. I don’t even remember the lift-off. I was already asleep. I didnt wake until the stewardess gently shook me and asked if I wouldn’t like to wake up for dinner. I did.

    Liked by 1 person

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      Sleeping on an aeroplane depends very much on the weight of the passengers sitting on either side or in front. Last time on the way to Bali, a monstrous left knee kept my right thigh from getting adequate blood flowing around. I had to get up and do exercises to prevent dvt. The passenger’s right knee almost took the left passenger out of circulation.
      I wished it would have been possible to be put in business class on grounds of compassion. Something has to be done!

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Julia Lund Says:

    When I was at school, a geography teacher fell asleep in the middle of teaching us a lesson. I don’t think half the class realised 😊

    I too have an under active thyroid and chronic fatigue too. I was just thinking this morning, after being the first to leave a lively gathering yet again last night, that even though I wish my health were different, I wouldn’t change my life for anyone else’s.

    Like

  12. rodhart (@roderick_hart) Says:

    I fall asleep a lot too, usually when watching TV. I frequently wake up still not knowing who done it. I have not had a thyroid check, but reading your post I don’t think you suffer from narcolepsy, or you would fall asleep in platefuls of food from time to time. My cat had the test, though, because cats have two thyroid glands and hers were causing her heart to beat too fast.

    Like

  13. gerard oosterman Says:

    Yes, Rod. There is nothing like a good, complicated and totally incomprehensible thriller to doze off with.
    The ‘Missing” is one of those for me. Brilliantly acted and filmed, the music alone makes my hair stand upright. The plot weaves around the country side and cities. And after 8 issues, almost everyone is murdered or soon will be. But, the Missing keeps on missing. Yes, sleeps overcomes all.
    No, give me Rin Tin Tin anytime or even Bonanza.

    Like

  14. petspeopleandlife Says:

    You were in rare form on this post. Made me laugh and that is good.
    I’ve been taking a thyroid pill for years. It is a must for me since the thyroid affects major organs of the body. Mainly the heart and our brain too.🙂

    Like

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      My thyroid is not the only under-active part. I had the function test done again but haven’t heard anything back which is a good sign. Last year they tested me on ageing. I had to fold a piece of paper and put it on the floor. I passed gloriously. With the thyroid test on Thursday I was asked to spell my own name and give my d.o.b. Again, ten out of ten.

      Liked by 2 people

  15. iamthyroidtoday Says:

    Falling asleep everywhere, anytime – doesn’t matter if you just listening to Wagner’s ‘The dance of the Valkyries’, Handel Water Music (there I think some healthy people would fall asleep) or someone is using a hammer next to you, sounds familiar to me!😂 I am fighting with underactive thyroid gland, after few years I found out also meditations doesn’t work too much. I am new here, but you are very welcome to visit my site and see how my daily fight looks and what I decided to change in my life to feel better and just normal🙂 Maybe something will inspire you. Soon more articles iamthyroidtoday.com
    Wish you all the best!
    B.

    Like

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