Venture capital needed for Worm Farm.

The house in Currumbin Eco Village

The house in Currumbin Eco Village

When we were at the Eco Village we lived in a magnificent house that is owned by a Dutch lady who spent the week in South Australia. While there, and walking around her beautiful garden, I noticed a structure consisting of round black plastic containers stacked on top of each other. Underneath was a bucket that contained a black molasses type of liquid that seemed to be oozing out through a tap fastened at the bottom of this multi layered structure. I thought at first it might have been a bee-hive. I opened the top lid and noticed it contained food scraps. I poked around a bit and soon found out this was a worm-factory. It was clearly something that would recycle food waste into soil by hard working worms.

There were whole clusters of shiningly healthy red coloured worms. They were clearly very hungry, squirming about. They reared their heads, looking at me as if in need of something. Were they giving me a hint? I went inside the house and told Helvi about my discovery.  She knew something about people breeding worms for the garden but it was too early in the morning for her. I could not entice her to go out and share in my newly found animal kingdom. She preferred instead to sip her coffee and look at mums and joey kangaroos  cavorting outside near our back balcony.

Cavorting Kangaroos at Eco Village

Cavorting Kangaroos at Eco Village

 

After our return from the delights of the Eco village at Currumbin, Helvi decided she too wanted to have worms growing by the thousands. We went to Home-Hardware and bought at great costs the basic worm breeding contraption. For unfathomable reasons this is called a ‘worm -farm’. When running this contraption past the cashier, she duly scanned it and we paid the amount that came up on the register. ($75.-) She was very friendly and asked ‘ are you planning to breed worms?’  Yes, I said, adding, ‘ how long does it actually take before you can ‘actually’ eat them?’ ‘I believe they make a good stir-fry’?   ‘Oh no, this is for the garden only.’  She took me seriously. I was going to ask, if one is not going to eat them ,why call it a ‘farm’? Usually farms are where people grow edible things , either in vegetation or animals. Anyway, I wasn’t going to expand on my silly joke seeing the girl wasn’t into  my school-boy humour at all.

The worms don’t come up by themselves. It can only be achieved by buying a ‘starter- pack’. A starter- pack costs $ 52.- for 1000 worms. A booster pack costs $28.- for a mere 500 worms. It is also suggested you buy a coconut fibre block. Apparently worms will simply refuse to cohabitate or mate, if denied the joy of this fibre ($ 22.-) . A warm fibre blanket on top of worms to give them privacy is also recommended. ($9.90)  With all the costs adding up I was tempted to suggest the name from worm-farm ought to be changed to worm-hotel.

The good thing is that all the carton packing and wrapping in which all these worm related items came in can be put into the worm farm for the worms to convert in rich black soil. It is actually called ‘worm-castings’, as if the worms are elevated on some kind of theatre- stage.

Anyway. It has been four days now since two lots of ‘booster-worms’ ( $56-) were released on top of the coconut fibre and underneath the blanket. They must be busy mating like mad. (something I can only be envious off) I gave them some left- over Basmati rice and marinated chicken from last night and only hope they will do their job and convert it into soil for our Clematis and Hardenbergia which we planted at the same time.

I just wonder how they can sell worms in lots of 1000 and 500. Do they count them? When worms mate, how do they recognize each other? Are they faithful?

Someone is making a nice little earner in breeding worms.

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36 Responses to “Venture capital needed for Worm Farm.”

  1. Yvonne Says:

    Where do I sign up to transfer all my money to your new venture?

    Liked by 2 people

  2. rodhart (@roderick_hart) Says:

    I have on the shelf a small book by Darwin in which he asks the question Are worms intelligent? He then designs experiements and concludes that, in a certain sense of the word, they are.

    Liked by 2 people

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      I am sure they are intelligent enough not to muck up the world like we seem to be keen in doing. We now have a new PM who stronly believes in climate change but a cabinet who don’t. It is going to be tricky for the next few weeks till the Paris convention.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Carrie Rubin Says:

    Ew, I’m all creepy crawly now. I’d hate to think of a starter pack of worms spilling inside my house. I’d probably have to move.😉

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Dorothy brett Says:

    This one was so funny and well written. And yes somebody is making a lot of money. Seriously tho it is probably something that larger gardens would benefit from, otherwise Seasol etc.
    But a good suggestion put it by the bucket full on any greenery around your strata block and hopefully the green loppers will run out of energy trying to keep the fences etc naked, ha ha.

    Liked by 1 person

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      The green loppers would be seething with rage in this compound of ‘villas’.. Don’t get us going on the latest EGM whereby the chairperson still wanted to defy the order by NSW Dept. Of Fair Trading and go into a future debt to paint the outside.
      I had my laptop on the large table adding a hint that more legal action would be coming if things were not complied with.
      One of our neighbours crossed the street in order to avoid us.

      I console myself sitting in front of the worm-farm, talk softly and gently into their tiny ears. They are so nice and understanding.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. berlioz1935 Says:

    If you are interested in “worm farms” you could have seen the blithers here in action. We have them for the last twenty years. I could have given you a bucket full of sex crazed worms for free.

    Indeed, what they are producing, and we are “farming”, is called castings. The water that runs out of the “farm” is called worm juice.
    You can see, the language used is very polite.

    The “juice” has to be thinned with water before use on plants.

    But those creatures are very polite too. They don’t bother anybody. They are just munching away and reproduce. Therefore enhancing the environment. What we can’t say from us humans.

    And don’t buy those $10 fibre blankets, a newspaper will do. And since they can’t read they won’t take on any wrong attitudes from the paper. They munch them too.

    Liked by 4 people

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      Yes, we too have them around but H thought it a good way to get rid of our waste, especially the coffee grounds. We used to bury it in a compost heap but that attracted flies. We hope that the worms will do a better and quicker job.
      Yes, they do eat paper and have cut out The Daily Telegraph articles by that xenophobe par excellence, the Andrew Bolt. I’ll feed that to the worms as a special Sunday treat.

      Liked by 2 people

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      Berlioz. I wonder what worms you have in your garden? The most common ones are the ‘red wriggler’ or Eisenia Fetida. They are surface composters and eat half their weight each day but are somewhat shy..and like darkness. (Liberal National supporters)
      The African nightcrawler ( Eudrilus Eugeniae) is lighter in colour and very aggresive towards other worms but good composters.
      The Blue worm (Prionyx Excavatus) is more for the tropics, good composter too and friendly towards children.
      The Rolls Royce of worms is the Palouse worm. They can reach 1 metre in length and have been known to have symbiotic relationships with people. They originate from US prairie but as rare as a 1949 King George half-penny with a reverse embossed laurel bush at the bottom instead of at the top.
      Be aware that WA have a $ 39,- pest control inspection fee on all worms imported from other states.
      I am really getting enthusiastic about my worm farm.

      Liked by 2 people

      • berlioz1935 Says:

        I don’t know their name. They look pinkish and they don’t like the light. The worm farm should be positioned in a shady spot.

        Like

      • gerard oosterman Says:

        It must be such a wonderful sub-terranean world down under. Who knows what goes on underneath our feet. Worms are such an important ingredient in our ecology, about which I don’t know much.
        You are right, they don’t like light and just spend their lives in darkness, tunneling away, making things grow better. We should really have a day dedicated to worms. A worm day.

        Liked by 1 person

  6. Curt Mekemson Says:

    My two bits here is that worms are edible, Gerard. Peggy ate three: one was deep fried, one was sautéed, and one was still wiggling.She did it as a challenge when she was Principal of an elementary school. Each year she set a goal for how many books the kids would read. The kids, in return, would set a challenge for her that she would undertake if they read all the books. That year the kid’s challenge was that Peggy would have to eat worms. The kids were successful, and Peggy dutifully ate the worms in front of the whole assembly. –Curt

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Julia Lund Says:

    You could set up an ‘adopt-a-worm’ scheme and send subscribers photos of their proxy-worm-child. They could even choose names for their worms …

    Liked by 3 people

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      Good idea Julia,
      There are many worms being cast off wandering below the streets of suburbia looking for love and affection. Many end up sad and dispirited. The dysfunction of modern life means so many end up like the discarded souls of what once was a united community with the common aim of making good soil, nurturing the petunias of Mrs Murphy or the cacti in rockery of David Smith.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. nonsmokingladybug Says:

    Oh my Gosh, I own a worm farm so it seems. Give me your address and I send you a starter package, because I have so many in our yard.

    Great post.

    Like

  9. kaytisweetlandrasmussen83 Says:

    I found myself thinking of Pl.T. Barnum’s famous slogan: “There’s a sucker born every minute. However, I had a cousin who actually was a “worm farmer” big time. Don’t think he made much from it though.

    Like

  10. greenwritingroom.com Says:

    I’ll be interested to know how this goes, Gerard. I quite fancy the idea, but I’ve heard that success is not always a given. Keep us posted.

    Like

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      I had a peek underneath the worm blanket yesterday and it was a mass of squirming red worms. So far so good. I wonder if small packets of worms in plastic bags would make nice Christmas presents? Perhaps with a ribbon around it.

      Liked by 2 people

  11. Forestwoodfolkart Says:

    Loved the Wormworld Hotel” post and all the hilarious comments. I remember Pat Cash was promoting these kits some time back. Haven’t heard much of him since… but I am pleased to hear of a beneficial eco product.

    Like

  12. stuartbramhall Says:

    Congratulations worm farms are very popular in in New Plymouth. In a few months, you’ll need to find someone to give (or sell) your surplus worms to. If they get overcrowded, they’ll start to die.

    Like

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      Thank you Stuart,

      Now that Christmas is getting closer there will be no shortage of worm enthusiasts in our circle of friends. We are thinking of taking a couple of kilos of the worms to the Currumbin Eco village for Christmas. All the dwellings there have above ground vegetable patches. Kangaroos will only eat grass and don’t touch the vegetables nor the fruit.
      I am sure that Aldi will soon market worm kits in the future, perhaps under the pet-section or dairy products.

      Liked by 1 person

  13. petspeopleandlife Says:

    I like this post a lot. Great info and worm castings make the best soil enricher. Your plants will be gorgeous and bloom with abandon.

    Like

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      Thanks Yvonne,
      I think we should all be more aware of the good things that nature provides us. Worms form a huge part of that. Some might think they are yucky but they are really angels in the world of nature and nurture. They give us the soil that makes our gardens , gives us food to grow and without them we would not enjoy health. Next time you see a worm; think about them with fondness and reverence .

      Like

  14. gerard oosterman Says:

    For those people that want to find out more about worms, I’ll post this video on how to identify the ‘red wriggler’.

    It is perhaps useful when next in the garden with you friends that you can tell them on how to identify this industrious worm.

    Enjoy the movie.

    Like

  15. Venture capital needed for Worm Farm. | Oosterman Treats Blog | WORLD ORGANIC NEWS Says:

    […] Source: Venture capital needed for Worm Farm. | Oosterman Treats Blog […]

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