Our Garden

A view from the kitchen window

A view from the kitchen window

It should not surprise anyone that the view from our kitchen window could only be a disadvantage in cooking. I mean why not just perch yourself over the sink and stare out? We don’t know what those blue nodding flowers out there are but according to Helvi ‘whatever they are, I am sure it is a herb and edible’. They come up each year and flower for months on end. They are over two metres high and are competing hotly with the indoor tree on the stairs. Perhaps you dear reader could throw some light on it. If they are edible, why cook anything? There is enough there to feed an entire dinner table for six weeks.

But, that’s not all. There is more. Look at the dark background. A forest of edible goodies also. They are bay leaf trees as high as our house. I don’t know if one can cook up a storm just by baking bay leaves but I don’t think it would kill anyone. Bay leaves have been used to add aromatic flavours to food even as early as during Grecian times. When dried and sprinkled it can be handy in food larder or laundry to keep out insects and other vermin.

I was shocked to read in Wiki that when bay leaves are packed between tissue paper and put together with beetles, cockroaches and other insects in a glass jar, the insects soon become docile and become easy to mount. I had to read it twice, thinking they must be talking about large animals such as cows and bulls. I know from our farm experience with mating animals that docility is not a pre-requisite for mounting each other. Not on our farm anyway. Then I thought, surely no matter how perverse or decadent, no human being would be lusting after a docile beetle or dragon fly having been drugged deliberately by some fiendish pervert?

It then came to me that people have all sorts of hobbies and obsessions, and that the mounting of insects must mean tacking them on a piece of paper or cardboard sheets, all part of an admirable science in collecting the various insects and possibly cataloguing them for future reference. Doesn’t most of our medicine come from those people that study the world of animals and plants?

I really have to pull myself together and resist seeing evil where there is none. That’s why I love looking outside my kitchen window.

Tags: , ,

26 Responses to “Our Garden”

  1. Silver in the Barn Says:

    Well, of course, mounting can be taken in multiple ways so one understands your confusion. Gerard, I can’t possibly identify a plant photographed from such a distance. It’s a lovely shot but can’t you zoom in a bit next time so one can begin narrowing it down. I use bay leaf in my stews and German red cabbage and sauerkraut but not much beyond that. One of those trees would last me a lifetime.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. gerard oosterman Says:

    Try clicking on the photo. It should enlarge. The blue flowers attract lot of native bees. Always a good sign.

    Like

  3. Silver in the Barn Says:

    Yes, and I’ve gone on-line, but can’t identify it. It’s awfully pretty but I don’t think I’ve ever seen it before. Sorry. Maybe some of your Australian readers will recognize it instantly.

    Like

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      I think it might be a kind of salvia. It has a pungent minty smell. There are many varieties. This one is over 2 metres tall and grows very quickly. Salvia in some US States is under review because it is sometimes cultivated for psychedelic drug effects.
      Nothing seems safe now. Soon the humble potato will be banned. With the addiction by millions to the chips at Big Golden Arched MacDonalds, I would not be surprised.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. berlioz1935 Says:

    It is a wicked story, perhaps helped by the Rose I see standing by the sink?

    Like

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      You are right berlioz. A helping hand at times. It is a glass with water used to rinse the previous night’s Shiraz out. What is your favourite tipple?

      Like

    • Berlioz Says:

      Shiraz with a nibble of that “tasty” cheese you were talking about the other day

      Like

      • gerard oosterman Says:

        Yes, there is nothing wrong with Shiraz and the ‘tasty’ cheese. I once tried it with un-tasty and it wasn’t too bad. I went to the shop and asked if they had any un-tasty cheese but they had sold out to a group of hungry tourists from France.

        Liked by 1 person

      • berlioz1935 Says:

        Those “ignorant” French must have been amazed to find such a thing as “un-tasty” cheese. Surely they wanted to show off at home of what they found in Downunder. It is the same with good government starts today. What did we have up to date?

        Like

      • gerard oosterman Says:

        Yes, they, the French might like to study a government ‘before’ the present ‘good’ government was going. They must wonder why they ‘ the previous bad’ government got voted in. Perhaps the ‘un-tasty cheese’ played a part.

        Like

  5. petspeopleandlife Says:

    How fortunate you are to have a lovely garden just beyond the kitchen window. The blue flowers are beautiful. I wish that I could grow a bay tree in central Texas but I’ve never seen any for sale in the nurseries. I cook with bay leaves and I really like the taste that the leaves give to a dish. That reminds me that I need to buy some more bay leaves. I add them to beans and a veggie stew that I make.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. bkpyett Says:

    I think your blue flower might be a salvia. Difficult to see it, but obviously happy there.

    Like

  7. thevenerable1 Says:

    Betcha they’re lupins, you lucky bastards !!!!!

    Like

  8. Andrew Says:

    I think it is better not to know what they are, Gerard. That way you can speculate about the hallucinogenic properties without fear of contradiction. Mix them with some magic mushrooms and dream of mounting.

    Liked by 2 people

  9. stuartbramhall Says:

    I can’t see your blue flowers very clearly. Are they borage? http://www.naturespic.com/NewZealand/image.asp?id=40400

    Like

    • gerard oosterman Says:

      Thank you for your kind research on this plant. No, borage is rather stiff and strong. These stems are very wispy and it all moves with the slightest breeze which is great to watch. I am sure it is a salvia. It smells very minty. Helvi took a cutting of it from a local garden street planting.
      She can put a match-stick in soil and make it grow.

      Like

  10. hilarycustancegreen Says:

    They are lovely and I think your other respondents are right – a kind of salvia. As for the insects, I’m appalled. When we were little my father showed how to chloroform moths, I feel bad about it now, but at least they were dead.

    Like

  11. kaytisweetlandrasmussen83 Says:

    I would say salvia, but you’ve already tried that. Pretty though.

    Like

  12. Patti Kuche Says:

    Those leaves are giving the story away . . . . !

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: