More Words.

Our Garden

Our Garden

It is now quite clear. The garden is reclaiming our house. It started innocently enough with the Virginia creeper crawling up the garage wall without really saying anything. We left it alone knowing the leaves would come down no matter what. It’s burnished gold was pleasing to look at and helped us cope with the chillness of autumn winds. This chillness has now almost become winter but the winds have calmed. In a rebuke to winter I noticed the daffodils are starting to burst through the mulch. The mulch came compliments of a large branch of the Manchurian Pear.

The tree got caught in a tempestuous Willy Willy and it managed to tear off a huge branch. A very large machine was called in which taught the tree a bitter lesson. The branch was fed into this machine which chipped it into a large truckload of mulch. The machine was merciless and you should have heard the screaming protesting wail from the tree branch. All to no avail. I asked the truck to dump the chipped Manchurian tree branch on our parking lot, which it did. This mulch is now feeding the daffodils and jonquils which proves that goodness is often (but not always) eked out of the bad, no matter what.

Reclaiming garden

Reclaiming garden

We had a small shed build in the back yard some 4 years ago after we moved in. Inside this shed are Helvi’s gardening tools including also a bucket full of gardening gloves and several pairs of secateurs. There is a hand mower. The hand mower is lovely to use. It doesn’t have a motor. I could not cope with the noise. The silent rotating blades on this mower is a joy to watch and reminds me of mowers of my youth. There is also a fold-up canvas camping chair. When the sun is out I sometimes sit in that chair, try and soak up a lovely warmth. So does Helvi. We both soak up warmth.

Time passes now with an ever increasing noise of gardening machines and technology. I mean those whipper snippers are really the pits… The autumn has witnessed again the relentless use of those bazooka like leaf blowers. Often people seem to like using those machines. Is it Freudian? I mean they strap them on, march up and down the street, and point hem at the leaves in a revengeful manner. What have those leaves ever done to them? Is it an expression of suffering marital whiplash? Fair enough, but take it out underneath your despairing blankets but not against the innocent leaves or our ears.

We had pasta left over last night. I’ll try and drown it in a mixture of milk, eggs, pepper and salt with lots of formaggio and bake it. That’s it, just wack it into the oven on high heat. The cheese will get brown and crispy. Hoorah!

A bit of peace and quiet goes a long way.

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17 Responses to “More Words.”

  1. Andrew Says:

    I grew to like the leaf blowers. I discovered that I can take pleasant abstract photographs of the leaves in motion. This discovery was made one beautiful morning in a Helsinki park. The park attendant thought I was mad but I liked the result. Otherwise unnatural noise is one of my greatest dislikes in life. I am happy to bathe in a pool of birdsong but not much else. Was it Debussy who wrote “On hearing the first lawn mower in Spring”?

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  2. gerard oosterman Says:

    Do you think the lawn mower has replaced the lark? I am sure a composer could write music to the rattle of a lawnmower. Perhaps rappers are a result of noise responding to a pneumatic regular middle C?
    Show us the Helsinki park leaves if you bothered to save them! Philip Glass could write a complete symphony here during the leaf blower’s festival.

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  3. M-R Says:

    Whipper-snippers should be illegal. They don’t actually do anything except drive others mad, anyway.
    Your baked pasta sounds very yummy. Please report.

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    • gerard oosterman Says:

      I’ll let you know in a few hours. The suspense is killing us. I might just add a chopped-up chili.
      Whipper snippers ought to be banned or put under the chaplaincy care program. I do hope the program will continue to install some honesty amongst politicians. Abbott is catholic as well, amazing.

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  4. Lottie Nevin Says:

    I quite like the sound of a lone lawn-mower in the distance, it reminds me of summer and childhood. I agree with you about the leaf-blowers, there is something phallic about them. I had something similar strapped on to me when I helped out with the olive harvest – one of my jobs was to ‘blow’ the fallen olives in to heaps underneath the trees. I was deaf by the end of the day and felt sick from the smell of petrol, What a wuss I am!!๐Ÿ˜€

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    • gerard oosterman Says:

      I don’t know if lawn-mowers feature kindly in my childhood. Dad used to go red and almost speechless with rage trying to start the mower up. The quality of a week-end depended vey much on the Victa lawnmower getting started.
      The tenacious Australian flies would crawl all over Dad’s face while he was pulling and pulling the chord. He finally had enough and chased a fly running around the garden totally besides himself. He held a screwriver at the ready to stab the offending fly. Poor dad. It was all so hard.
      What an experience blowing olives in heaps. Do you have flies in Spain.
      I’ve heard of Spanish fly. You’re a brave woman Lottie, not scared to tackle anything, even olive blowers..

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  5. rod Says:

    I could not agree with you more regarding leaf blowers. They are totally pointless, cost natural resources to make, more natural resources to run, and are incredibly noisy. Someone bought me one for Christmass one year, but I soon got rid of it.

    I feel the same about dish washers. In our house, I am the dishwasher.

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  6. gerard oosterman Says:

    They blow leaves onto the neighbours footpath or into the kerb, and then what? What is it that people resent about leaves? I wish there was a Poli- blower to blow politicians into a kerb or down the drain. Would they actually decay or make a good compost?

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  7. berlioz1935 Says:

    I like the images you create. Noise is terrible, especially made by people attacking nature.

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    • gerard oosterman Says:

      Why doesn’t an inventor invent a remote so that noisy garden machinery can be silenced? We now get a few months of respite when grass stops growing. Soon at the first spring, the mowers and snippers will announce themselves once again.
      It used to be the swallow that was the first harbinger of spring..

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  8. Carrie Rubin Says:

    Sounds like that might be the last time that tree acts up. If he knows what’s good for him, anyway…๐Ÿ˜‰

    Nothing disrupts my evening walk more than the deafening sound of a leaf-blower. Certainly does a good job of shattering the calm!

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    • gerard oosterman Says:

      The tree, after asking forgiveness, is now full of remorse and promises. It has been given respite and takes it a day at a time.
      I noticed our JRT ‘Milo’ cocking his leg against it several times while looking up, as if to say; ‘cop this, and stop wingeing!’.
      We all have to pull our weight and will be lucky to get out alive.

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  9. Patti Kuche Says:

    So no-one enjoys the blissful contemplation and solitude of raking the leaves anymore?

    Like

  10. hilarycustancegreen Says:

    Aaargh the leaf blower! Someone told me it was banned in some countries. I wish I had you pile of wood chips, though.

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